Sat-nav warns London lorry drivers of cyclists

Apr 18, 2013

A British firm has unveiled a sat-nav system that warns lorry drivers when they are approaching roads where they are at high risk of hitting a cyclist.

Navevo's device is currently limited to providing alerts in 100 danger spots in London, but the company hopes to extend the project in the future.

"I do believe this will save lives at some point," the company's CEO Nick Caesari told AFP.

"It does slow people down and increase their awareness of hazards in the road. Of course, we may never know if it has saved a life—but if it saves even one person it will have been worth it."

Lorries make up just five percent of London's but they are involved in half of the city's cyclist deaths.

Between 2009 and 2012 53 were killed on London's roads, of whom 28 had been hit by lorries.

Sat-nav or GPS devices are increasingly popular with drivers looking for directions, but Caesari said this was the first to give warnings that cyclists could be approaching.

The system works by providing visual and sound alerts to lorry drivers as they approach popular with both cyclists and heavy goods vehicles (HGVs).

The list of 100 danger spots is based on data provided by Transport for London, the city's transport authority.

Explore further: Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

'Aeroplane flaps' on lorries to save lives in Europe

Apr 15, 2013

Rolling out round-nosed lorries with aeroplane-style flaps at the back on Europe's roads would cut fuel costs, reduce carbon emissions and save lives, while giving a boost to the struggling auto sector, the ...

Recommended for you

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

11 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Neuroscientist's idea wins new-toy award

Apr 15, 2014

When he was a child, Robijanto Soetedjo used to play with his electrically powered toys for a while and then, when he got bored, take them apart - much to the consternation of his parents.

Land Rover demos invisible bonnet / car hood (w/ video)

Apr 14, 2014

(Phys.org) —Land Rover has released a video demonstrating a part of its Discover Vision Concept—the invisible "bonnet" or as it's known in the U.S. the "hood" of the car. It's a concept the automaker ...

Visions of 1964 World's Fair didn't all come true

Apr 12, 2014

Video phone calls? Yeah, we do that. Asking computers for information? Sure, several times a day. Colonies on the moon and jet packs as a mode of everyday transportation. OK, maybe not.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

(Phys.org) —Quantenna Communications has announced that it has plans for releasing a chipset that will be capable of delivering 10Gbps WiFi to/from routers, bridges and computers by sometime next year. ...

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

Unlocking secrets of new solar material

(Phys.org) —A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

How kids' brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring ...