Russian spaceship may fail to dock to ISS

Apr 25, 2013
This file photo shows a Russian Soyuz rocket with cargo Progress carrier blasting off from Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, on August 2, 2012. An unmanned Russian spaceship carrying 2.5 tonnes of cargo may be unable to properly dock with the International Space Station after its navigation antenna failed to properly deploy, Interfax said on Thursday.

An unmanned Russian spaceship carrying 2.5 tonnes of cargo may be unable to properly dock with the International Space Station after its navigation antenna failed to properly deploy, Interfax said on Thursday.

The news agency report cited a Russian space industry source as saying that the Progress may be impeded in its docking operation by the improperly protruding antenna.

The antenna would create a space between the craft and the space station's hermetic seals that would make opening of the station's hatches too dangerous, the report said.

"After the cargo carrier manually docks with the station, the unopened antenna could run up against the docking node," the unnamed source told Interfax.

"In that case, the docking process will be impossible to complete in a perfectly hermetically-sealed manner."

The source added that this would then require for the crew on board the ISS to perform a spacewalk during which the problem could be fixed.

The Progress is taking up fresh fuel and oxygen supplies as well as equipment and water.

Russia's space agency said it would continue sending to the Progress trying to fix the problem throughout Thursday afternoon.

The navigation antenna failed to deploy properly shortly after the Progress lifted off on top of a from the Baikonur space station that Russia leases from Kazakhstan on Wednesday.

The 14-year-old international space lab is currently manned by two American astronauts and a Canadian as well as three Russian cosmonauts.

Explore further: NASA Mars spacecraft prepare for close comet flyby

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Russian cargo ship docks with ISS

Jul 29, 2009

A Russian cargo ship, launched Friday from the Baikonur space station in Kazakhstan, docked Wednesday with the International Space Station, the Russian news agency Interfax said.

Russia tests faster space docking route

Aug 02, 2012

An unmanned Russian cargo ship docked with the International Space Station (ISS) in a record time, officials said Thursday, taking just under six hours from launch to complete the journey.

Russia launches cargo vessel for space station

Apr 27, 2011

An unmanned Russian cargo vessel set off Wednesday on a mission to supply the crew on board the International Space Station with a new shipment of equipment and supplies.

Progress 25 docks at the space station

May 15, 2007

A Russian Progress spacecraft loaded with more than 2.5 tons of supplies and equipment docked with the International Space Station at 1:10 a.m. EDT Tuesday.

Recommended for you

NASA Mars spacecraft prepare for close comet flyby

17 minutes ago

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19.

Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate

17 hours ago

For the first time, Spanish researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water and is left to dry, b ...

How do we terraform Venus?

17 hours ago

It might be possible to terraform Venus some day, when our technology gets good enough. The challenges for Venus are totally different than for Mars. How will we need to fix Venus?

Biomarkers of the deep

18 hours ago

Tucked away in the southwest corner of Spain is a unique geological site that has fascinated astrobiologists for decades. The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) in Spain's Río Tinto area is the largest known deposit ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

VancouverDoug
not rated yet Apr 25, 2013
This is just the sort of thing that Dexter, the ISS's generation 3 remote manipulator system is designed for. Grapple the Progress with the primary RMS and then use Dexter to unfurl the stuck antennae. The wrinkle however is that the Progress is not designed to be grappled. Time for NASA and Roscosmos to go all "Apollo 13" on the resupply craft and do a space walk.