LulzSec hacker pleads guilty to cyberattacks

Apr 09, 2013

A British computer hacker affiliated to the group Lulz Security pleaded guilty Tuesday to cyberattacks on institutions including Sony, Britain's National Health Service and Rupert Murdoch's News International.

Ryan Ackroyd admitted one count of carrying out an unauthorized act to impair the operation of a computer.

Prosecutors say the 26-year-old accessed websites belonging to Sony, 20th Century Fox, the NHS, Nintendo, the Arizona State Police and News International between February and September 2011.

He will be sentenced May 14 at Southwark Crown Court in London. Other charges against him are being dropped.

Three other British hackers—18-year-old Mustafa Al-Bassam, 20-year-old Jake Davis and Ryan Cleary, 21—had previously pleaded guilty to launching distributed denial of service attacks on organizations including the CIA and Britain's Serious Organized Crime Agency. Denial of service attacks work by overwhelming sites with traffic.

Prosecutors say Cleary's targets also included U.S. Air Force computers at the Pentagon.

LulzSec, whose name draws on Internet-speak for "laugh out loud," shot to prominence in mid-2011 with an eye-catching attack on U.S. television network PBS, whose website it defaced with a bogus story claiming that the late rapper Tupac Shakur had been discovered alive in New Zealand.

An offshoot of the loose-knit movement known as Anonymous, LulzSec and its reputed leader, known as Sabu, had some of the highest profiles in the movement. But last year U.S. officials unmasked Sabu as FBI informant Hector Xavier Monsegur and officials on both sides of the Atlantic swooped in on his alleged collaborators, making roughly half a dozen arrests.

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Moebius
3 / 5 (5) Apr 09, 2013
He should get life and send a message to hackers. A slap on the wrist, like they're going to get, sends the message to other hackers to not worry too much about getting caught.

I know a lot of idiots here disagree with this but hackers will probably prove my point if these guys get a heavy sentence.

Hackers have almost no redeeming value and hiring one just encourages others to follow in their path of mayhem.
geokstr
1 / 5 (2) Apr 09, 2013
Geez, pigs must be skydive snowboarding in Hades. I had to give you a "5" for the first time ever. But you don't have to feel all guilty about it - I already know you'll never return the favor.
antialias_physorg
3.7 / 5 (3) Apr 09, 2013
He should get life and send a message to hackers. A slap on the wrist, like they're going to get, sends the message to other hackers to not worry too much about getting caught.

Look at it from the perspective of the hackers. They are fighting - in their eyes - an oppressive systems (big corps, government secrecy, omnipresent surveillance, etc. )

Now consider: What message do you think will they see in a draconian sentence?
geokstr
1 / 5 (2) Apr 09, 2013
Look at it from the perspective of the hackers. They are fighting - in their eyes - an oppressive systems (big corps, government secrecy, omnipresent surveillance, etc. )

Now consider: What message do you think will they see in a draconian sentence?

When they start hacking on a regular basis the countries that would execute them if they catch them, like China, Russia, Cuba, North Korea, Iran, then that's courage. Not these easy pickings from a reasonably open, free country like the US which will give them a slap on the wrist.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Apr 10, 2013
Hackers have almost no redeeming value and hiring one just encourages others to follow in their path of mayhem
The only way to know that defenses will work, is for them to be attacked by a genuine foe. Hackers harden the system. Which is why they often must be Created for the Purpose.
Look at it from the perspective of the hackers. They are fighting - in their eyes - an oppressive systems (big corps, government secrecy, omnipresent surveillance, etc. )
So are suicide bombers. So were mcvey and Jim jones and the Mumbai murderers.

Secrets are NECESSARY. Dont you have any secrets you wish to preserve over there in eurodisneyland? What happens when hackers cause your power grid to go down next winter? Or cause your LNG facilities to blow up?

You willing to give the people who hate you just because you exist, the ability to steal everything you've got and destroy your way of life?

Apparently so. Luckily for you the best of them are on your Side.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Apr 10, 2013
You know maybe AA has a point. The west should be willing to disclose its secrets so long as it's enemies are willing to do the same. Why don't you draw up a mutual disclosure agreement AA and send it over to al jazeera for publication?
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Apr 10, 2013
The west should be willing to disclose its secrets so long as it's enemies are willing to do the same.

You honestly don't see a problem in the logic of this statement, do you?

(Hint: It's the same logical fault that leads to armament spirals...and with the same detrimental outcomes)

And, as noted in my post (if you had read it): "IN THEIR EYES..."

Moebius was talking about 'sending a message to other hackers'...but in order to judge what a message will be interpreted as you have to look at it from the RECEIVER's point of view - not from the SENDER's.

Is that too complicated to understand?
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Apr 10, 2013
Armament spirals. So, from the perspective of YOUR eyes, north Korea and iran and the taliban should be able to have nukes because the west does? Certainly in THEIR eyes, this is only proper as they have many enemies to destroy.
oppressive systems (big corps, government secrecy, omnipresent surveillance, etc. )
In the eyes of most rational people, there are powerful entities in this world who fully intend to send it back to the middle ages. Most think that when they are caught they should be prevented from EVER carrying out their plans. In war you do not seek to punish an enemy but to eliminate them. For that is what they will do to you if you don't.

Only the west has the tools which can end overpopulation which leads inevitably to war. This makes us the good guys.

In YOUR eyes AA, how would you feel if the major powers had all gotten rid of their nukes and we were now watching nk and Iran building them for use and sale to others? Wouldn't you feel a little anxious?