H&R Block: IRS clears returns affected by glitch

Apr 24, 2013

H&R Block says the Internal Revenue Service has finished processing most returns affected by a software glitch.

The Kansas City-based preparer said Wednesday that more than 90 percent of affected clients have received their refunds or a notice of a possible refund date.

The update came after the IRS announced March 12 that problems affecting about 660,000 tax returns would delay refunds by as long as six weeks. The IRS later announced that the processing delays would last closer to two to four weeks. The agency had nothing new to add Wednesday.

The affected people claiming education tax credits who filed returns between Feb. 14 and Feb. 22. Besides H&R Block, a limited number of other software companies also had problems, but the IRS hasn't named them.

Explore further: Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Software glitch delays 660,000 tax refunds

Mar 14, 2013

The Internal Revenue Service says 660,000 taxpayers will have their refunds delayed by up to six weeks because of a problem with the software they used to file their tax returns.

Early income-tax filing not the best deal

Dec 13, 2010

The early bird doesn't always get the worm. Moreover, said a consumer-finance expert in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, being in a hurry to file your federal income tax forms in pursuit of a ...

Recommended for you

Net neutrality balancing act

1 hour ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

Apr 16, 2014

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

Apr 16, 2014

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Net neutrality balancing act

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

Bionic ankle 'emulates nature'

These days, Hugh Herr, an associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT, gets about 100 emails daily from people across the world interested in his bionic limbs.