Google resells print rights to Frommer guide founder

April 4, 2013
Google said it had "returned" the print rights for Frommer's travel books to company founder Arthur Frommer less than a year after acquiring the popular tourist guides.

Google said Thursday it had "returned" the print rights for Frommer's travel books to company founder Arthur Frommer less than a year after acquiring the popular tourist guides.

Financial terms were not disclosed.

said in a statement it was "focused on providing high-quality to help people quickly discover and share great places" and had been integrating the Frommer's content into Google+ Local and our other Google services.

"We can confirm that we have returned the Frommer's brand to its founder and are licensing certain travel content to him," a Google spokesperson said.

The move comes eight months after Google said it was acquiring the Frommer's brand and its travel content from US publishing house John Wiley & Sons.

Google added the Zagat restaurant review to its Google+ social network last year, as it rolled out a new local search feature that takes on services such as Yelp.

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