Google Glass hacked and rooted—Google claims it was the plan all along

Apr 29, 2013 by Bob Yirka weblog

(Phys.org) —Just days after landing in the hands of developer's, Google Glass has been hacked and rooted by at least two well known "hackers." The first comes courtesy of Jay Freeman, who most know online as Saurik. He claims in a Twitter post that he was able to get root within two hours of receiving the device while having dinner with friends. Another well known hacker, Liam McLoughlin also announced he'd hacked the device. Neither development is a surprise to Google apparently, as shortly after Freeman and McLoughlin boasted about their success in circumventing Google Glasses' security measures, Google technical lead on the project Stephen Lau, posted a statement saying that Google had left the device easily hacked for the benefit of developers. Another staffer at Google, Tim Bray, in responding to news of the hacking tweeted simply, "Duh."

There is no denying that Glass has generated a lot of buzz—some consider it a game changer on the order of the introduction of the first . Along with that buzz, however, has come concern that the new device might present a privacy problem. Some establishments have already banned them, despite the fact that they have not yet been released to the public. The concern is in how the devices might be used. An application could, for example, be written and used that allows someone to count cards at a casino. For that reason, Google has chosen to make the device more difficult to hack than phone's that run the same —Android version 4.04, aka Ice Cream Sandwich. They've also "bricked" the device which means Google can remotely disable the device—permanently—if the user/owner uses it an a way that Google prohibits, which presumably would mean trying to jail-break the device to allow root access, and thereby unrestricted application use.

What's not clear at this time, however, is just how secure the device will be once Google releases it to the general public. The version sold to developers (for $1500 apiece), called the Explorer Edition was made available to developers to allow for apps development prior to general release. In his post, Lau encouraged all developers to "go crazy with it" suggesting that Google is benefiting from its new device being hacked—doing so means security problems are being found that Google can fix before making Glass available to everyone else.

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User comments : 6

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Argiod
1 / 5 (5) Apr 29, 2013
Would you pay $1500 to be a beta tester for this?
Michael7171
2.3 / 5 (3) Apr 30, 2013
's is not used in plurals.
nowhere
1 / 5 (1) Apr 30, 2013
Would you pay $1500 to be a beta tester for this?

Would you pay $1500 to gain early access to a development environment so you can gain an advantage on a potentialy "game changing" device?
Mayday
1 / 5 (1) Apr 30, 2013
I would definitely jump at the chance to play with this device. In active social environments, the potential for team coaching of a socially engaged wearer is huge. It is the ultimate wingman. It's a logical next step up from the time I entered into conversation with a woman at a bar -- she asked my name and proceeded to unceremoniously google me on her iPad. She and her friends will be in line to buy these things. Two years from now, you won't have any idea if you are talking to the real person, or their friends' hive mind. What fun!
Whydening Gyre
1 / 5 (5) Apr 30, 2013
This is "evolution" in it's purest form...
Huns
1 / 5 (2) Apr 30, 2013
Would you pay $1500 to be a beta tester for this?

No, but I would beta test it for them if they paid me $1,500. That way, they'd get reports that wouldn't be tainted by $1,500 worth of confirmation bias.