Fujitsu unveils device that lets printed paper become interactive (w/ video)

Apr 16, 2013 by Bob Yirka report

(Phys.org) —Fujitsu Laboratories has unveiled a new twist in touch-screen technology—an overhead projector/camera device that turns printed pages into interactive media. Called the Fingerlink Interaction System, it lets users highlight text or images using a single finger then drag them to one side for future use; tap on web-links and have web pages open, or use their fist to animate virtual 3D objects.

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Recognizing that and smartphones have not yet made real paper obsolete, engineers at Fujitsu have created a device that allows people to use printed products in ways they've become accustomed to doing with . The system works by utilizing standard computer cameras, an overhead projector, and electronics to run it all. In practice, it looks like a cylinder, about two feet tall that sits on the edge of a table. At the top of the cylinder is an overhang that contains the electronics, cameras and projector. To use the system, a person lays a piece of paper—or even an open book—on the table and allows the system to recognize it, which appears to happen very quickly. Next, the user reaches out a hand and extends a single finger for using as an interactive device. The system scans the finger noting its size, orientation, and even its color. This is to allow it to differentiate it from all other objects on the table. Once the system learns all it needs to know about the finger, the user can use it to highlight text on the printed page, graphics or pictures. Dragging them off to the side causes the highlighted material to be captured as a single unit and held for later use. The system also recognizes web page addresses and highlights them automatically. Tapping them with the finger causes the associated web page to be opened and stored in the area next to the printed material. It can also overlay information over the top of the printed material if desired.

The engineers at Fujitsu also added another separate feature to the system that allows a user to manipulate virtual in virtual space using their fist. At the demonstration, reps for the company indicated that the system is not yet ready for sale, but plan to make it so sometime next year. They added that they believe such technology would be very useful as a demonstration device, for travel agencies, for example, or as a way to allow users to interact with and fill out forms at governmental offices.

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More information: via Diginfo

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User comments : 14

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Lurker2358
1.5 / 5 (16) Apr 16, 2013
Yay.

More waste for consumerism!

Michio Kaku's dream of a disposable computer on a piece of paper we can crumble up and throw away is almost upon us! He said it would be 30 years, and it's been about 3!

Let's waste as many resources as profanely possible!
betterexists
1 / 5 (12) Apr 16, 2013
Hitherto, Pets such as Cats & Dogs etc are flabbergasted by ipads, iphones etc...watching so many videos on youtube & various other video sources. They had/ve no clue.

From now on it will be the turn of the Humans too(that depend on Documents for Serious Survival).

If paper cheats you...what else to look for?
italba
2.3 / 5 (3) Apr 16, 2013
Lurker, are you sure you understood what's written in the article? Here http://www.digita...ojector/ you can find a movie of it. I really want one!
QuixoteJ
2.1 / 5 (16) Apr 16, 2013
1. Create a product no one needs and that probably shouldn't exist in the first place.
2. Convince people they need it.

3. Make a million dollars.
igginz
5 / 5 (3) Apr 16, 2013
This is good research. The obvious demonstration points shown here may hide some more powerful applications. Purely as a data collection system, it is step forward from a flatbed scanner. Perhaps libraries with valuable archive materials could make digital copies with less wear n tear on the source objects.
I don't think this is consumer product at all.
dav_daddy
1 / 5 (8) Apr 16, 2013
I see this as a major tool for copyright infringement. Not that, that is necessarily a bad thing.
powerup1
1 / 5 (2) Apr 16, 2013
1. Create a product no one needs and that probably shouldn't exist in the first place.
2. Convince people they need it.

3. Make a million dollars.


It is more that a little hypocritical for someone with the world view that you have, to be using a computer and the internet.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (7) Apr 16, 2013
It is more that a little hypocritical for someone with the world view that you have, to be using a computer and the internet
The fact, computers are useful doesn't imply, everything what was created about it is useful as well. IMO this concept is example of Darwinian evolution: some concepts must be created for being forgotten immediately.
italba
1 / 5 (2) Apr 16, 2013
1. Create a product no one needs and that probably shouldn't exist in the first place.
2. Convince people they need it.

3. Make a million dollars.


Fujitsu already earns a billion dollars a week.
gwrede
1.9 / 5 (9) Apr 17, 2013
I would combine this with a computer screen image projected to the tabletop. That would be a nifty way of getting a 40 inch tablet. Throw in a wireless keyboard, and I'd actually pay for it.

QuixoteJ
1 / 5 (7) Apr 18, 2013
It is more that a little hypocritical for someone with the world view that you have, to be using a computer and the internet.
I don't use computers for things they were never meant to be used for, so I don't see how I'm being hypocritical. If I am, then please elaborate, because I don't want to be hypocritical.

The crux of my problem with this technology is that its development seems to have gone like this:

[People like touchscreens] --> [Make everything a touchscreen]

We are NOT supposed to turn everything into a touchscreen, and I would even argue that it is downright wrong to treat a copy of certain works of literature as though they are one.

Oh, and make sure you wash and dry your hands thoroughly before you start wiping your main finger across every page of something you just HAVE to have in psuedo e-format.
dougie_fresh_007
not rated yet Apr 20, 2013
i disagree it's not touchscreen it is its interactiveness that's attractive . to utilize any document and 'work' with it without an interface
packrat
1 / 5 (7) Apr 22, 2013
I could have a lot of fun with one of these interfaced to a good 3D cad program. It would be very useful.

Gwrede's idea of a 40" tablet setup would work really well for for that too. Now if it could be setup on a regular angle adjustable drawing table, that would be even better- at least for me.
Guy_Underbridge
not rated yet Apr 22, 2013
does it have a filter to remove cheese-ball yellow?

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