US says EU rules on biotech crops 'unnecessary'

Apr 01, 2013
The United States on Monday criticized "unnecessary" European Union rules against genetically modified US crop imports as it prepares to enter free-trade talks with the EU.

The United States on Monday criticized "unnecessary" European Union rules against genetically modified US crop imports as it prepares to enter free-trade talks with the EU.

EU restrictions notably have resulted in delays in the approval of new GM traits "despite positive assessments by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)," the US Trade Representative's office said in a report on reducing trade sanitary barriers.

The USTR also criticized the EU for imposing "commercially infeasible requirements" on GE content in under EU Traceability and Labeling regulations.

"Foreign governments continue to impose discriminatory or otherwise unwarranted measures on US ," Demetrios Marantis, the acting USTR, said in a conference call.

"These barriers not only harm US and farmers... but they also deprive consumers around the world an access to safe, high-quality US food and agricultural goods," Marantis said.

The US and the EU are planning to launch negotiations aimed at creating the world's biggest free-trade area that will cover the politically sensitive question of genetically modified crops.

Allowed in the US, they are strictly regulated in the EU where only two have been authorized. Eight member states, including Germany and France, have adopted measures to keep them out.

The USTR pointed to the EU's "unnecessary and burdensome coexistence requirements to planting of GE crops alongside non-GE crops by certain EU member states."

A French official, speaking on condition of anonymity last month, said that France did not want the upcoming trade negotiations to cover crops.

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Lurker2358
2.7 / 5 (6) Apr 01, 2013
When a laboratory experiment with non-GM corn control vs GM corn test group found that the GM test group of mice eating such corn grew tumors, it tells me something is wrong with the damn corn.

It's been on the market in the U.S. for 2 decades, and the total number of cases of autism, aspergers, adhd, and other mental and nervous disorders is the highest it's been in history.

This is considering they cut LEADED gasoline out, which doing so should have reduced all mental defects and disorders, and has been shown to raise general I.Q.

Nevertheless Diabetes and minor to moderate mental disorders are higher than ever in recorded history. Why?

Because something is wrong with the damned food. You can blame being fat on eating the wrong things and not exercising enough, but you can't blame autism spectrums, adhd, or neuropathy on the individual.

If someone asked you to drink a small via full of BT toxin every day, you wouldn't do it, but you eat BT corn with as much or more of the toxin.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (1) Apr 02, 2013
I go to a mall looking to purchase a pair of running shoes. One of the stores tells me all they sell are dress shoes, and that is what I should accept.
Why should the government even be involved in promoting one type of product over another? Leave it up to farmers to choose to grow whatever gives them the best return.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Apr 02, 2013
I'm pretty glad that the EU deems this neccessary.
If US consumers want to eat GM food - fine. But I'd rather have a choice in the matter.

but they also deprive consumers around the world an access to safe, high-quality US food and agricultural goods,"

They do not deprive anyone of anything coming from US farms. You just need to label the stuff - that's all.
The only thing that is forbidden is to plant this crap in certain countries.
Lurker2358
1.8 / 5 (5) Apr 02, 2013
Why should the government even be involved in promoting one type of product over another? Leave it up to farmers to choose to grow whatever gives them the best return.


Really?

Food safety laws of other types exist for a reason. The FDA was created so you don't end up with diseases and foreign objects in your food...

YET the BT Corn is specifically engineered to produce a disease and death causing toxin...

Does that make any sense? Hell no.
Rutzs
1.3 / 5 (3) Apr 02, 2013
Here we go, lets put our tinfoil hats on.

Lurker is spewing out conspiracy theories... Use your critical thinking, and decide for yourself. Google it. This is the same guy that believes cold fusion technology exists.

Here is one of hundreds of articles that disprove the bias study made against GM corn.

http://www.forbes...d-study/
Wolf358
5 / 5 (2) Apr 02, 2013
Okay, I have my tinfoil hat firmly in place. Consider the economic benefits to a certain nameless company which provides seeds which contain toxins known to kill or injure pollinators... Coming soon to a store near you: self-pollinated plants. Are all your bees dead from a mysterious ailment? Who cares? We've eliminated the middle-man! And you can only buy them from _us_! (Want to share some of my tinfoil?)

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