EPA blamed for delaying asbestos study in Montana

Apr 18, 2013 by Matthew Brown

(AP)—Internal investigators have faulted the Environmental Protection Agency over years of delays in completing health studies needed to guide the cleanup of a Montana mining town where hundreds of people have died from asbestos exposure.

The EPA's Office of Inspector General says in a report Thursday that the studies are necessary to determine whether expensive, ongoing are working in the town of Libby.

The area near the northwest corner of the state, about 50 miles from the U.S.-Canada border, was declared a in 2009, a decade after federal regulators first responded to concerns over asbestos dust that came from a W.R. Grace vermiculite mine.

The vermiculite was used as insulation in millions of U.S. homes.

At least $447 million has been spent on the cleanup.

Explore further: Obama says 'no greater threat to planet than climate change'

0 shares

Related Stories

Scientists seek former students in toxic MT town

Jun 04, 2010

(AP) -- Researchers have embarked on an ambitious study to track the health of thousands of high school graduates over a half century in a Montana town where a toxic mine has killed hundreds of people and ...

A sad legacy—Victims of childhood asbestos exposure

Sep 04, 2012

(Medical Xpress)—"Wittenoom kids" who spent their childhoods exposed to asbestos in the north-west of Western Australia are now developing a range of cancers or dying at a rate well above the average population, ...

Recommended for you

China's struggle for water security

19 hours ago

Way back in 1999, before he became China's prime minister, Wen Jiabao warned that water scarcity posed one of the greatest threats to the "survival of the nation".

Canada revises upward CO2 emission data since 1990

20 hours ago

Canada revised its greenhouse gas emission data from 1990 to 2013 in a report Friday, showing it had higher carbon dioxide discharges each year, and a doubling of emissions from its oil sands.

Climate censorship gains steam in red states

Apr 17, 2015

While plenty of people found humor in the recent news that officials in Florida and Wisconsin are censoring state workers' ability to talk about, much less work on, climate change, other states are not necessarily laughing. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.