Helping to forecast earthquakes in Salt Lake Valley

Apr 17, 2013

Salt Lake Valley, home to the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch fault zone and the West Valley fault zone, has been the site of repeated surface-faulting earthquakes (of about magnitude 6.5 to 7). New research trenches in the area are helping geologists and seismologists untangle how this complex fault system ruptures and will aid in forecasting future earthquakes in the area.

At the annual meeting of the (SSA), Christopher DuRoss and Michael Hylland of the Utah Geological Survey will present research today that indicates geologically recent large earthquakes on the West Valley fault zone likely occurred with (or were triggered by) fault movement on the Salt Lake City segment. DuRoss and Hylland consider it less likely that West Valley fault movement happens completely independently from movement on the Salt Lake City segment. This likely pairing has implications for how the in is modeled.

The trenches have also helped the researchers revise the history of large earthquakes in the area, showing that the segment has been more active than previously thought. Since about 14,000 years ago, eight quakes have occurred on the segment. Depending on the time period, these quakes have occurred roughly every 1300 to 1500 years on average. It has been 1400 years since the most recent large earthquake on the segment. The earthquake history of the West Valley fault zone had been largely unknown, but now four earthquakes have been well dated.

This new fault research contributes to a broader goal of evaluating Utah's earthquake hazards and risk. For example, this type of information on prehistoric earthquakes will be used by the Working Group on Utah Earthquake Probabilities, formed under the auspices of the Utah Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey, to forecast probabilities for future earthquakes in the Wasatch Front region.

Explore further: Likely near-simultaneous earthquakes complicate seismic hazard planning for Italy

More information: Poster title: "Latest Pleistocene and Holocene paleoseismicity of the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch fault zone and the West Valley fault zone, Utah – unraveling the rupture behavior of a major graben-forming fault system"

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Why do earthquakes stop?

Feb 06, 2008

The underlying structure of a fault determines whether an earthquake rupture will jump from one fault to another, magnifying its size and potential devastation. Understanding why some earthquakes terminate along a fault, ...

Ill. earthquake a wake-up call

Apr 20, 2008

A U.S. seismologist said the earthquake that jolted the Midwest Friday is a reminder of the risks seismic events pose outside familiar quake areas.

Relationship between two recent New Zealand earthquakes

Sep 26, 2011

The relationship between two earthquakes that took place near Christchurch, New Zealand, in September 2010 and February 2011 is examined in a paper published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that t ...

Recommended for you

NASA radar system surveys Napa Valley quake area

14 hours ago

NASA scientists are conducting an airborne survey of earthquake fault displacements in the Napa Valley area of Northern California using a sophisticated radar system developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, ...

Aging Africa

Aug 29, 2014

In the September issue of GSA Today, Paul Bierman of the University of Vermont–Burlington and colleagues present a cosmogenic view of erosion, relief generation, and the age of faulting in southernmost Africa ...

NASA animation shows Hurricane Marie winding down

Aug 29, 2014

NOAA's GOES-West satellite keeps a continuous eye on the Eastern Pacific and has been covering Hurricane Marie since birth. NASA's GOES Project uses NOAA data and creates animations and did so to show the end of Hurricane ...

User comments : 0