Alert to Congress: Nuclear evacuation may bog down

Apr 10, 2013 by Jeff Donn

A new government report challenges a pillar of planning for disasters at American nuclear power plants. It finds that people living beyond the official 10-mile evacuation zone might be so frightened by the prospect of spreading radiation that they would flee of their own accord, clog roads, and delay the escape of others.

The report is to be released Wednesday by the , but was obtained in advance by The Associated Press. It says federal officials should properly study how people outside the official 10-mile evacuation planning zone would respond in an emergency.

The federal government's Nuclear Regulatory Commission disputes the finding and stands by the current standard.

The investigation was requested by four U.S. senators in 2011. They were reacting to an AP investigative series reporting weaknesses in community planning for nuclear accidents.

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Slick
1 / 5 (1) Apr 10, 2013
I live in Zone 1, that closest to SONGS San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in San Clemente CA. So Cal Edison has put out a safety pamphlet that claims that in the event of an accident traffic flows in Zone 1 will move north west toward Los Angeles. There is no traffic flow toward the south east because traffic in that direction flows closely past the plant. SONGS has been shut down because of design failures, and a related radiation release. Further SONGS is in a area known to be susceptable to a major San Andreas Fault earthquake almost 100% sure to happen in the next 20 years that is forecast powerful enough to level Los Angeles. Edison and the NRC in my opinion are purposefully hiding information of this nature from local residents, who don't understand that in an accident gridlock will immediately shut off egress from Zone 1. Loss of life and property loss will be huge. Edison and NRC are liars intent on restarting SONGS, which must not be allowed.