CO2 at work during last global 'hot spell' but hardly alone

Apr 08, 2013
CO2 at work during last global 'hot spell' but hardly alone
Scientists aboard the ocean drillship JOIDES Resolution retrieve deep-sea sediment cores. Credit: Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

(Phys.org) —UC Santa Cruz ocean sciences professor Christina Ravelo is part of an international team that is using ocean floor sediment samples to compile data on past periods of global warming in order to understand today's climate changes.

In a study published this week in the journal Nature, Ravelo and co-authors report that temperature patterns during Earth's last prolonged global "hot spell"—the Pliocene, some 5.3 to 2.6 million years ago—differed dramatically from those of modern times.

The researchers compiled records of going back five million years, to the early Pliocene. The records reveal a world with fairly uniform in the whole of the Tropics prior to 4 million years ago—a significant scenario that typical fail to show.

"If we want to understand our future climate, we have to be able to understand the climate of the past," said lead author Alexey Fedorov from Yale University.

The researchers say other factors must be considered besides a build-up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Their findings are based on an analysis of ocean floor sediments collected by drilling into the ocean floor.

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QuixoteJ
2.8 / 5 (9) Apr 08, 2013
Word of climate models failing, and scientists urging to consider other factors besides CO2 when studying climate... should be big news, yet the article is only 7 sentences long. Does anyone know if the aticle in Nature is longer?

Anyhow, yay for science.
Maggnus
3.5 / 5 (6) Apr 08, 2013
Well, that's a pretty misleading synopsis of what was said, and leaves a terribly misrepresented impression of climate study.

Of course studies take into account other factors than CO2, they really aren't as simplistic as your comment would have us believe.

And it should be big news why? And even if that is so, why misrepresent the import of the article? That it is short doesn't mean its not considered important.

And why do you suggest climate models are "failing"? What is your definition of failing? Less than perfect?

And is the non-perfection of climate models not the reason that research like this is done? To give more data points to use in helping the models become closer to perfection?

What axe do you have to grind Quixote?
antigoracle
2.2 / 5 (13) Apr 08, 2013
The researchers say other factors must be considered besides a build-up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Hmmm... really, who are these quacks. They must not have heard the AGW Alarmist and their High Priest Gore braying - The debate is over. The "science" has concluded it is all because of man-made CO2.
MikPetter
5 / 5 (2) Apr 08, 2013
From the papers abstract "About five to four million years ago, in the early Pliocene epoch, Earth had a warm, temperate climate. The gradual cooling that followed led to the establishment of modern temperature patterns, possibly in response to a decrease in atmospheric CO2 concentration, of the order of 100 parts per million, towards preindustrial values.." The paper goes on to talk unknown feedback systems that modified temperature gradients during this warming. One of the authors concludes "Said co-author Chris Brierley, a former Yale postdoctoral researcher now at University College London, "I'm worried that we can't discount a possible future that has a vast pool of warm water covering the tropics, and the nasty changes in the atmospheric circulation and rainfall changes that would go along with that."
QuixoteJ
1.6 / 5 (8) Apr 09, 2013
[maggnus]And why do you suggest climate models are "failing"?
I didn't. The article did:
[article]The records reveal a world with fairly uniform warm temperatures in the whole of the Tropics prior to 4 million years ago—a significant scenario that typical climate model simulations fail to show.


[maggnus]And is the non-perfection of climate models not the reason that research like this is done? To give more data points to use in helping the models become closer to perfection?
Non-perfection is the inconvenient truth about any model or simulation. But yes I believe study is used for improvement.

[maggnus]What axe do you have to grind Quixote?
Basically what I said in my original comment. This article is 7 sentences long. Most articles about climate are 5 - 100 times that long (the ones that don't mention models failing, etc)
Maggnus
4.2 / 5 (5) Apr 09, 2013
@ quixote - "fail to show" in the context used in the article is not "failing" in the context used by you. By all means, critisize the way the article is written, or the science it is based on, but there is no traction in misrepresenting the data. That is a classic method used by all types of crackpots on this site, but seems especially prevalent in those who deny that global warming is occurring.

My question still stands. The article is 7 sentences long. So? Did they not get the researchers findings reported? Did they miss or misrepresent anything the researchers said? Are you suggeting the import of an article is determined by the number of sentences the author of the article uses to report it?

Not the first article you've commented on in such a way as to suggest you have an issue with the information reported on in the article. So, again, what axe do you have to grind?

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