Archaeologists plan more digs at Richard III site

Apr 30, 2013

Archaeologists who unearthed the skeleton of England's King Richard III under a municipal parking lot say they want to dig up a 600-year-old stone coffin found nearby.

University of Leicester scientists say they hope to learn more about the medieval Church of the Grey Friars, where Richard was unceremoniously buried after he was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485.

In February scientists from the university announced that remains found on the site were "beyond reasonable doubt" those of the king.

Now the university says it wants to examine a nearby tomb which may contain the remains of a 14th-century medieval knight, Sir William Moton.

The university said Tuesday it has asked for an exhumation license from the and plans to start digging in July.

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