Volkswagen shows all-electric four-seater at Wolfsburg meet

Mar 16, 2013 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org) —The Volkswagen e-up!, an all-electric city car, is not for sale just yet, but this week the first-ever Volkswagen production electric vehicle was "unveiled" at a press and investors gathering in Wolfsburg, Germany, company headquarters. The news that EV watchers will want to know most about this new vehicle, as with any EV announcement these days, will center around practical concerns such as how long does it run before the battery power is depleted, and charging requirements. As for the e-up! it has an 18.7kWh lithium-ion battery pack, with a 93-mile range (150km) and provides the driver with a dual charging system. The battery is integrated under the floor area. A "Combined Charging System" supports AC and DC charging. The advantage of this, said the company, is that the driver can more easily charge the car at any charging station without worrying about the right power source. Also, it can be recharged up to 80 percent in 30 minutes.

The port for charging the battery in the e-up! is hidden behind the 'fuel door'. The Combined is presented as an option. The system was standardized by the company along with other .

The vehicle has been designed as a four-seater, with a top speed of 84mph (135km). The e-up! all electric car is being suggested as a vehicle for daily use in the city, for daily commuting, and as a second car.

Other selling points will be that it operates with almost no noise; there are stylish LED running lights and machine-polished wheels. The interior design features light gray seat covers with blue top-stitched seams. "Leather and chrome accents" convey "a puristic impression," according to the company release.

This year the e-up! will have another debut, this time its "fair premiere" at the in Frankfurt later this year. Orders will start up after that. At the time of this writing, expectations were that the car would be sold outside the US.

Explore further: ASU grant aims to transform global energy landscape

More information: www.volkswagen-media-services.… oeffentlichkeit.html

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User comments : 17

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Doug_Huffman
1 / 5 (5) Mar 16, 2013
I see no estimated battery life, in years of corrosion or charge/discharge cycles, and no replacement cost in this article or the linked URL.

EV are a NIMBY dream, remotely burning fossil fuel.
Yelmurc
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 16, 2013
Why do most electric cars look like golf carts. Please actually design a decent looking car if you want these to take off. Its like they make them ugly on purpose so they don't sell and they build them for PR.
Doug_Huffman
1 / 5 (4) Mar 16, 2013
D'ya mean like the various Tesla models? Teslamotors.com Have you seen their cost/price? EV are for regulators and folks with more money than good sense/cents. NIMBY fuel burners.
praos
1.8 / 5 (5) Mar 16, 2013
Please actually design a decent looking car if you want these to take off. Its like they make them ugly on purpose so they don't sell and they build them for PR.


It's a little beauty, so decent-looking, so measured, so serene and unpretentious. Have you taste inspected.
Claudius
1.8 / 5 (5) Mar 16, 2013
These days, most people seem to choose cars that are as "pretentious" as possible.
antialias_physorg
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 16, 2013
The only thing that is really holding EVs back at the moment is the price. What the CEOs of car companies fail to appreciate: there's no middle class anymore.
People either are rich or poor. The rich don't care - they can afford the gas - and the poor can't afford to buy a car that costs double of what their current car would cost (and offers less in almost every aspect).

Car manufacturers seem somewhat removed from reality these days. Yes: selling these things at affordable prices will lessen profits. But once you have people hooked on them they will have more disposable cash (because EVs cost less in terms of maintenance and fuel)...and then they'll be able to buy more pricey cars again.
p62071
not rated yet Mar 16, 2013
This car is ugly. I mean great concept but cant you make a nicer looking car or just applying this technology to your vw bug ?
Shakescene21
1 / 5 (1) Mar 16, 2013
It will be a few years before VW markets this car in the US, and I expect there will be some improvements by then. I will probably check it out when it arrives.
arq
not rated yet Mar 17, 2013

Millions of people in europe and asia use small cars( about the size of this).

Design element of this car is similar to the small cars that i mentioned above.

All volksawagen has to do is work on the price a little bit.
sennekuyl
not rated yet Mar 17, 2013
I see no estimated battery life, in years of corrosion or charge/discharge cycles, and no replacement cost in this article or the linked URL.

EV are a NIMBY dream, remotely burning fossil fuel.

Remotely burning fossil fuel and using it in EVs are more efficient than burning it in ICEs and magnitudes easier to upgrade or transformed in planned manner. You get fewer outliers running against the grain for the sake of it.

That EVs have problems is without a doubt but the reason given above is merely being difficult, not an intelligent rebuttal.
Doug_Huffman
1 / 5 (3) Mar 17, 2013
Inefficiencies are multiplicative. All combustion engines, internal and external, have similar efficiencies due to similar material limitations. Then add transformation and transmission inefficiencies to your EV. It's the fractional improvement that makes the technology expensive. In the end it's transportation per dollar and the ICE vehicle is proven cheap.

Intelligence, like beauty, is in the judgement of the eye, and not "Not utter'd by base sale of chapmen's tongues.
NikFromNYC
1 / 5 (3) Mar 17, 2013
Doy! It takes *hours* to fill up the tank with electrons. Then it runs out of juice every time you get a booty call from an ex-girlfriend. After a few years the whole battery pack needs to be replaced. Synthesizing liquid fuel makes a lot more sense than lugging batteries around, and the infrastructure already exists. No power grid could actually survive millions of these anyway. This is truly the age of stupid. Nuclear power used to suck CO2 right out of the air and convert it to gasoline is an R&D worthy project that should receive $billions of federal funding, but isn't.
Newbeak
not rated yet Mar 17, 2013
Maybe the recent breakthrough in making graphene super capacitors will finally give us practical electric cars:http://cleantechn...acitors/
djr
5 / 5 (1) Mar 17, 2013
Nik - "After a few years the whole battery pack needs to be replaced" Please define 'a few years' - and give us some references. Here is a page showing RAV4 EV owners who have all gotten 100,000 miles out of the batteries. One owner reporting that in 100,000 miles - he has replaced one set of tires, front brakes, and 2 auxiliary batteries (this is not the EV drive batteries). http://www.evnut....100k.htm Many of these batteries are now 10 years old.

Misinformation is so easy to spread - much harder to retract.
djr
not rated yet Mar 17, 2013
When you read some of the comments on articles like this - it is understandable to wonder why there are people in our world determined to spread disinformation about technological advances such as electric cars. This is an interesting article rebutting a recent Wall Street Journal attack on EV's. http://cleantechn...istakes/
Newbeak
not rated yet Mar 17, 2013
When you read some of the comments on articles like this

Yeah,but EVs will only hit the big-time when and if better,cheaper batteries (or super capacitors) are developed.
djr
not rated yet Mar 17, 2013
Yeah,but EVs will only hit the big-time when and if better,cheaper batteries (or super capacitors) are developed.

Agreed - and the research to make that happen is going on now. Toyota predicts that by 2020 they will be using next gen batteries - should give us 3X current range - and significantly lower costs.