Sweden scraps new word 'ungoogleable'

Mar 26, 2013
The "Google" logo is seen on a tablet screen. The Language Council of Sweden says it has removed the word "ungoogleable" from its 2012 list of new words because it refused to give in to the US company's demands to include the word Google in the definition.

The Language Council of Sweden said Tuesday it had removed the word "ungoogleable" from its 2012 list of new words because it refused to give in to the US company's demands to include the word Google in the definition.

The list of new words in the Swedish language came out in December, including the term "ogooglebar", which was defined as something "which cannot be found on the Internet with the use of a ."

The Language Council said had since then repeatedly contacted it to insist that the definition include a mention of the company's name.

"Google has referred to that protects trademarks and wants the Language Council to change the wording of the definition, introducing the name Google into the definition, and adding a disclaimer where we point out that Google is a trademark," the Language Council's head Ann Cederberg said.

"We have neither the time nor the desire to engage in the long, drawn-out process Google is trying to initiate. Neither do we want to compromise and change the definition of 'ogooglebar' to the one the company wants," she said.

"That would go against our principles, and the principles of language. Google has forgotten one thing: doesn't care about the protection of trademarks," she added.

"Today we are instead removing the word" from the list, she said.

Google Sweden declined to comment when contacted by AFP.

The Language Council, which is under the authority of the Swedish culture ministry, does not determine which new words are officially accepted into the Swedish language—that is the role of the Swedish Academy. Instead, the council merely notes which new words are gaining popularity among .

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User comments : 6

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Moebius
3 / 5 (4) Mar 26, 2013
Almost any verb with un in front and able in back is still a word. And Google, whatever that is, is a verb. And don't 1-star this comment, it's un1-starable.
hopefulbl
1 / 5 (1) Mar 26, 2013
google was taken from word googleplex, so how can google stop any word with google in it....it might also be taken from googleplex, not google
DarkHorse66
5 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2013
google was taken from word googleplex, so how can google stop any word with google in it....it might also be taken from googleplex, not google

Wrong
The number itself is a 'googolplex' and that is a different animal entirely.
'googleplex' is the headquarters of google and is named after the 'googolplex'. Google took its name from the 'googol':
http://au.answers...7AAgWYn9
http://searchcio-...ogolplex
http://en.wikiped...ogolplex
Cheers, DH66
antialias_physorg
1 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2013
Words that are based on products are not that uncommon, and I don't see why google would make a fuss about it.
(You order a coke not a cola - no matter if it's Coke or Pepsi or any other kind, right?)
The word "googeln" (to use google for a search) has been part of the 'official' german dictionary for 5 years or so.
DarkHorse66
1 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2013
It's in the English dictionary too:
http://dictionary...e/google
So is 'google bomb':
http://dictionary...e%20bomb
The page even links to how to make one. It also links to a translator section, eg Google bombardieren (German) or Google бомба (Bulgarian) My favourite: Google buama (Irish) :)
Cheers, DH66
VENDItardE
1 / 5 (1) Mar 27, 2013
TRADEMARKS have to be protected.