Survey explores how gardeners are adapting to a changing climate

Mar 28, 2013
Survey explores how gardeners are adapting to a changing climate

As gardeners and farmers across Britain survey the frost damage and delayed growth of their plants this Easter, scientists at the University of Reading are asking gardeners to participate in a new survey to understand how gardeners are responding to the UK's changing climate.

Vines growing in Scotland, in England and longer, drier summers - these were among the long-term predictions 11 years ago in a landmark report commissioned by, among others, the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), based on work by scientists at the University of Reading.

Now scientists are conducting the biggest survey of its kind to find how gardeners are responding to the reality of Britain's changing climate, which has been dominated in recent years by cold spells in winter, extended periods of drought, record rainfall and flooding.

The new survey, again commissioned by the RHS, follows on from the 2002 report 'Gardening in the Global Greenhouse'. Since then, our understanding of how is affecting Britain has developed considerably.

Dr Claudia Bernardini, a climate change plant scientist at the University of Reading and RHS, said: "Over the past three winters many optimistic gardeners have seen borderline hardy plants such as the Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis), Soft tree fern (Dicksonia antarctica) and Hardy banana (Musa basjoo) killed by severe frosts and snow. Yet, despite this, climate models continue to predict a warming of the climate and we are told to prepare for much hotter summers in the medium term.

"The Royal Horticultural Society with the University of Reading are now launching a survey to better understand how individual gardeners are reacting to these difficult and to discover whether they have been provided with the knowledge they need to plan their gardening for the future.

"The latest projections indicate that the climate is likely to affect gardens and gardening in a significantly different way than that predicted in 2002."

The results of the will help researchers understand the perceived effects of climate change and the individual's response to those changes. The results will be used alongside the latest to produce a new report to support British gardeners and the horticulture industry.

"Whether you are a keen gardener or new to gardening, whether you visit parks and public gardens regularly or just occasionally, we would like to hear your view and personal experience of the effects of a ," Dr Bernardini added.

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More information: Take the online survey here.

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triplehelix
1 / 5 (8) Mar 28, 2013
"Dr Claudia Bernardini, a climate change plant scientist at the University of Reading and RHS, said: "Over the past three winters many optimistic gardeners have seen borderline hardy plants such as the Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis), Soft tree fern (Dicksonia antarctica) and Hardy banana (Musa basjoo) killed by severe frosts and snow. Yet, despite this, climate models continue to predict a warming of the climate and we are told to prepare for much hotter summers in the medium term."

LOL. Hilarious really. No predictive abilities at all. Continuously wrong forecasts year in year out, running for nearly 17 years now. Not a single bit of warming for 17 years. 1990-1997 heat waves they said warming. Now they reckon cooling. Not science. You can't state ANY outcome is proof of your theory. That is circular reasoning. Pick one, is it going to be hot or cold, and stick to it. You cant say "both" otherwise its circular, ergo, not scientific.
djr
5 / 5 (5) Mar 28, 2013
Triplehelix: "Now they reckon cooling."

Please provide references for climate scientists who are predicting cooling.

Every article that mentions climate - is immediately spammed by you and a few others on this board - spreading your false information - regardless of how many times it is shown to be nonsense. You really have a high opinion of your opinion.

" Not a single bit of warming for 17 years." Here we go around again. surface temperature are on a plateau - as has happened in the past. The other indicators tell us that warming is continuing. This article refutes your 'no warming' meme.

http://theenergyc...confirms

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