Four shark species win international trade protection

Mar 11, 2013
Hammerhead sharks are seen on a boat harboured to a dock in La Libertad, near El Salvador on April 11, 2012. Governments have agreed to restrict international trade in four shark species in a bid to save them from extinction due to rampant demand for their fins.

Governments agreed on Monday to restrict international trade in four shark species in a bid to save them from extinction due to rampant demand for their fins.

The 178-member Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted at a meeting in Bangkok to regulate exports of the oceanic whitetip shark and three species of hammerhead shark, but stopped short of a .

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