Rhino poachers target Kent wildlife parks

Mar 30, 2013
A de-horned black rhinoceros at the Bona Bona Game Reseve, South Africa on August 3, 2012. A leading UK wildlife charity appealed for volunteers on Saturday to help guard its herds of black rhino which are being targeted by poachers.

A leading British wildlife charity appealed for volunteers on Saturday to help guard its herds of black rhino which are being targeted by poachers.

The poachers are thought to have staked-out the foundation's two wild animal parks in Kent: Port Lympne near Ashford and Howletts near Canterbury.

After receiving a specific warning from police this week The Aspinall Foundation is recruiting volunteers to help keep watch for any suspicious activity at the parks.

Aspinall Foundation, chairman, Damian Aspinall said: "It is tragic and beyond belief that, as we do everything possible to restore these magnificent animals safely to the wild, the traders who seek to profit from their slaughter should bring their vile activities to the UK."

The foundation has successfuly bred 33 baby black rhino in captivity over the last seven years. Three of the foundation's rhino were returned to the wild in Tanzania in nine months ago.

in Africa hunt rhino for their valuable horns which some people believe can be used as powerful medicine. They hack the horns from the animals' corpses. The horn is then illegally traded , often for more than its weight in gold.

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Jo01
3 / 5 (4) Mar 30, 2013
Maybe some clever geneticist can grow horn from a few cells and flood the 'market' with it.
If nobody can see the difference the price should go to zero and no one will risk being shot when killing rhinos.

J.
Jo01
2.2 / 5 (5) Mar 30, 2013

P.S. It seems that religion and it's sibling superstition is the cause of most harm in this world; if we could leave that meme behind we only have to get rid of cruelness (not being able to get an empathic bond with other animals) and plain ignorance.
Ghostt
5 / 5 (2) Mar 30, 2013
So these poachers with guns and obvious criminal intent are there and you expect unarmed volunteers to go after them? This is a job for the government.
jsdarkdestruction
5 / 5 (1) Mar 31, 2013
How are they guarding them? Are they using non-violent methods? Those have been shown to be totally futile against these armed poachers. They should all be armed heavily with a shooton sight order for poachers. That might make a difference.