Seven rare Komodo dragons hatch in Indonesia

Mar 20, 2013
An Indonesian vet holds a baby Komodo dragon at Surabaya Zoo on March 14, 2013. Seven Komodo dragons have hatched under a breeding programme at the zoo, an official said, a success story that raises hope for the endangered lizard.

Seven Komodo dragons have hatched under a breeding programme at an Indonesian zoo, an official said, a success story that raises hope for the endangered lizard.

Twenty-one eggs from two Komodo dragons were placed in incubation at the Surabaya Zoo in eastern Java, the first batch in September and the second in October, with seven hatching on March 10.

"Some of the eggs from the first Komodo did not hatch, which is normal. We're hoping for another seven or eight from the second clutch, which are due to hatch around April or May," zoo spokesman Anthan Warsito told AFP on Wednesday.

He said the were the result of a breeding programme that begins with and involves protecting the young from predatory cannibalistic adult dragons as well as placing microchips in the babies to monitor their progress.

Komodo dragons, the world's largest lizards, can reach around three metres (10 feet) in length and 70 kilograms (154 pounds) in weight and are endemic to a cluster of islands in .

They are also popular at zoo exhibits around the world.

The species is considered vulnerable, with around 5,000 left in the wild.

Although deadly attacks are rare, several have clashed with humans in recent years, the latest victim an Indonesian tour guide who was in February bitten on the calf in the Komodo National Park.

Explore further: Female color perception affects evolution of male plumage in birds

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Komodo even more deadly than thought: Research

May 18, 2009

The carnivorous reptiles (Varanus komodoensis) are known to bite prey and release them, leaving them to bleed to death from their wounds: the victims are reported to go into shock before the dragons kill a ...

Rediscovering the dragon's paradise lost

Sep 30, 2009

The world's largest living lizard species, the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), is vulnerable to extinction and yet little is known about its natural history. New research by a team of palaeontologists and ar ...

Recommended for you

Dogs hear our words and how we say them

3 hours ago

When people hear another person talking to them, they respond not only to what is being said—those consonants and vowels strung together into words and sentences—but also to other features of that speech—the ...

Amazonian shrimps: An underwater world still unknown

4 hours ago

A study reveals how little we know about the Amazonian diversity. Aiming to resolve a scientific debate about the validity of two species of freshwater shrimp described in the first half of the last century, ...

Factors that drive sexual traits

6 hours ago

Many male animals have multiple displays and behaviours to attract females; and often the larger or greater the better.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.