Op should reduce Texas tiger's arthritic pain

March 19, 2013
Tacoma, a 13-year-old Siberian tiger, is shown in his enclosure at InSync Exotics animal preserve Monday, March 18, 2013, in Wylie, Texas. Tacoma is the first tiger in the US to go through a nerve surgery to alleviate pain caused from hip dysplasia. (AP Photo/John L. Mone)

(AP)—A vet hopes groundbreaking surgery has relieved the arthritic hip pain of a 13-year-old Siberian tiger at a Texas sanctuary.

Tacoma is one of the 66 big cats at the In-Sync Exotics Wildlife Rescue and Education Center in suburban Dallas.

Tacoma, a 13-year-old Siberian tiger, is shown in his enclosure at InSync Exotics animal preserve Monday, March 18, 2013, in Wylie, Texas. Tacoma is the first tiger in the US to go through a nerve surgery to alleviate pain caused from hip dysplasia. (AP Photo/John L. Mone)

President Vicky Keahey (KAY'-hee) says Tacoma has suffered from for two years. The pain started to affect him four months ago when he stopped exercising and his hind began to wither. All he did was sleep.

Dr. Toby Willis operated on Tacoma last week, cutting the nerves that carry pain impulses from his hip to his brain. Willis says the procedure, which has never before been performed in the U.S., should ensure the aging cat has less pain.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

Explore further: Groin injuries may be more serious than a pulled muscle

0 shares

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Genomes uncover life's early history

August 24, 2015

A University of Manchester scientist is part of a team which has carried out one of the biggest ever analyses of genomes on life of all forms.

Rare nautilus sighted for the first time in three decades

August 25, 2015

In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers ...

Study shows female frogs susceptible to 'decoy effect'

August 28, 2015

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers has found that female túngaras, frogs that live in parts of Mexico and Central and South America, appear to be susceptible to the "decoy effect." In their paper published in the journal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.