Study of Midwest finds increase in heavy rainfalls over 60 years

Mar 13, 2013

Heavy rains have become more frequent in the upper Midwest over the past 60 years, according to a study from the University of Iowa. The trend appears to hold true even with the current drought plaguing the region, the study's main author says.

The fact that temperatures over the country's midsection are rising, too, may be more than coincidence.The hotter the surface temperature, which has been the trend in the Midwest and the rest of the world, the more water that can be absorbed by the atmosphere. And the more water available for precipitation means a greater chance for , explains Gabriele Villarini, assistant professor in engineering at the UI and lead author of the paper, published in the Journal of Climate, the official publication of the American Meteorological Society.

"We found that there is a tendency toward increasing trends in in the northern part of the study region, roughly the upper ," says Villarini, in the civil and environmental and an assistant research engineer at the IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering. "We tried to explain these results in light of changes in temperature. We found that the northern part of the study region—including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois—is also the area experiencing large increasing trends in temperature, resulting in an increase in ."

Villarini notes the current affecting the Midwest and other regions of the country has occurred too recently to be included in his study, whose data goes from about 1950 to 2010.

"I'm not looking at the average annual rainfall. I'm studying heavy rainfall events," he says. "We may currently be in deficit for overall rainfall, but we may also be in the normal range when it comes to the number of heavy rainfall days."

The map shows location of selected rain gauges, with blue (red) triangles depicting sites with significant increasing (decreasing) trends, and white circles showing sites with little or no change. (Adapted from Villarini et al. (2013))

The map shows location of selected rain gauges, with blue (red) triangles depicting sites with significant increasing (decreasing) trends, and white circles showing sites with little or no change. Adapted from Villarini et al., 2013.

Villarini and his colleagues examined changes in the frequency of heavy rainfall through daily measurements at 447 rain gauge stations in the central and southern United States. The states included were: Minnesota, Wisconsin Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi.

Each rain gauge station has a record of at least 50 years. The data cover much of the 20th century and the first decade of this century. For the purposes of the study, heavy rainfall was defined as days in which rainfall exceeded the 95th percentile of the at-site rainfall distribution.

Villarini notes that while his study focused on changes in temperature and the frequency of heavy rainfall over the central United States, other published results have shown rainfall increases to be linked to changes in irrigation over the Ogallala Aquifer, which runs from Nebraska to northern Texas. Based on those studies, he says it is reasonable to assume that changes in land use, land cover and agricultural practice would affect the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere as well.

Explore further: Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

More information: The paper is titled, "Changing Frequency of Heavy Rainfall over the Central United States."

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VENDItardE
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F.O. moron
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Ok, I'll bite; what is an F.O.?
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You do notice that someone has hijacked Vendi's user name and is now going to spend days wasting our time with gibberish.

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