Magnetic soliton: Nano-droplet discovery presents opportunities for telecommunications

Mar 25, 2013

A Swedish research team has successfully created a magnetic soliton – a spin torque-generated nano-droplet that could lead to technological innovation in such areas as mobile telecommunications.

First theorized 35 years ago, the magnetic nano-droplet was created in a modified spintronic oscillator by a team from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and the University of Gothenburg. The breakthrough was published in the March 15 issue of Science.

Johan Åkerman, a professor in the Department of Physics, Gothenburg University, and associated guest researcher at KTH, is presenting the findings this week at the American Physical Society's March Meeting in Baltimore. Åkerman says that as early as 2010, the team began to modify spintronic oscillators in order to prove that magnetic nano-droplets exist.

The results of the research, which has been ongoing for two years, have been patented by the research team. Majid Mohseni, a researcher at KTH who defended the team research in December 2012, says that the findings could have significant impact.

"This will open up completely new possibilities in nano-magnetism and spintronics. Magnetic nano-droplets have great potential to translate into different applications," Mohseni says.

In , magnetic nano-droplets present opportunities to replace , such as mobile phones and wireless networks, with much smaller, less expensive and more resource-efficient components.

Solitons, or that behave like particles and retain their shape when moving at a constant speed, have been used for long distance, high speed . Scientists have long believed that they exist in magnetic environments, but until now they had never been observed.

The droplets take up a space of about 50 to 100 nanometers on a piece of . At their centre, magnetization points towards the opposite direction, both against the surrounding spin (a quantum physical property) and the applied magnetic field.

Explore further: Could 'Jedi Putter' be the force golfers need?

More information: Spin Torque–Generated Magnetic Droplet Solitons, Science 15 March 2013: Vol. 339 no. 6125 pp. 1295-1298 DOI: 10.1126/science.1230155

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Physicists create nanoscale spinning magnetic droplets

Mar 14, 2013

Researchers have successfully created a magnetic soliton – a nano-sized, spinning droplet that was first theorized 35 years ago. These solitons have implications for the creation of magnetic, spin-based computers.

Nanoscale spin waves can replace microwaves

Sep 07, 2011

A group of scientists from the University of Gothenburg and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden, have become the first group in the world to demonstrate that theories about nanoscale spin waves ...

A step forward for ultrafast spintronics

Sep 06, 2012

(Phys.org)—In spin based electronics the spin of the electron is used as a carrier of information. To meet the need for faster electronics, the speed must be increased as far as possible. Today, Uppsala physicists show ...

Self-assembling electronic nano-components

Jun 20, 2011

Magnetic storage media such as hard drives have revolutionized the handling of information: We are used to dealing with huge quantities of magnetically stored data while relying on highly sensitive electronic ...

Recommended for you

Could 'Jedi Putter' be the force golfers need?

Apr 18, 2014

Putting is arguably the most important skill in golf; in fact, it's been described as a game within a game. Now a team of Rice engineering students has devised a training putter that offers golfers audio, ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Apr 17, 2014

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...