Intelligent wearable vital signs sensor module developed

Mar 05, 2013
Intelligent wearable vital signs sensor module developed

Toshiba Corporation today announced that it has developed an intelligent vital signs sensor module, Smart healthcare Intelligent Monitor Engine & Ecosystem; Silmee, that simultaneously senses information on key vital signs: Electric Cardio Gram, pulse, body temperature and movements, and that can deliver the data to smartphones and tablet PCs with wireless technology. Toshiba has fabricated a prototype of the sensor module that is small enough to wear, and will present and demonstrate it at the International Symposium on Medical ICT 2013, to be held at Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan on March 7.

Current healthcare cloud and services make use of already developed individual healthcare devices, such as sphygmomanometers or clinical thermometers. Such services face major challenges in achieving market penetration because the equipment is too big and handling a number of pieces of equipment it too complex.

The recently developed Silmee includes a Pseudo-SoC analog front end, a 32bit ARM processor chip and a dual mode Bluetooth bare chip in a 14.5mm × 14.5mm small package. Simply adding a few devices to the module, such as an antenna, battery and sensor heads, achieves a completely wearable vital signs sensor system. Among the chips included in the module, the flexible and compact Pseudo-SoC analog front end is a very effective approach to implementing vital signs sensors, and extends recent rapid progress in vital sign sensor technologies.

Toshiba will demonstrate a very compact prototype implementation of Silmee: a 25mm × 60mm and 10 gram patch-type able to monitor all vital signs. will contribute to the promotion of smart personal healthcare services by deploying the module and prototype terminal in a wide variety of smart healthcare service development and field trials.

Explore further: FINsix small-size laptop adapter uses special power platform

Provided by Toshiba Corporation

4.5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Toshiba smartphone camera sensor has eye on future

Dec 28, 2012

(Phys.org)—Toshiba may be targeting the end of 2013 for the launch of a new camera sensor for smartphones and tablets, where the picture taker can choose a specific area of focus in the photo after having ...

Clever clothes in a smart world

Feb 14, 2008

Pretty soon your gym gear will be more high tech than the groaning treadmill beneath you. Smart textiles and wearable devices can monitor your vital signs as you go about daily life. These clever clothes already exist and ...

Recommended for you

Study: Samsung phone durable, but iPhone has edge

Apr 14, 2014

Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone is more durable than last year's model and other leading Android phones, but the iPhone 5s outperformed all of them in part because of its smaller size, a new study finds.

Invention loves collaboration at Milan show

Apr 14, 2014

Collaboration drove invention during Milan's annual International Furniture Show and collateral design week events, yielding the promise of homes without mobile phone chargers, and with more ergonomic seating, ...

Amazon 'to release smartphone later this year'

Apr 12, 2014

Amazon is preparing to release a smartphone in the second half of 2014, thrusting itself into a market already crowded with Apple and Samsung models, The Wall Street Journal reported.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

The U.S. freight railroad industry says only one-fifth of its track will be equipped with mandatory safety technology to prevent most collisions and derailments by the deadline set by Congress.

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain—evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.