ICANN clears 27 non-English domain name suffixes

Mar 22, 2013

(AP)—The agency in charge of Internet addresses says it's given preliminary approval for 27 new suffixes—all in Chinese, Arabic and other languages besides English.

They are the first approved out of nearly 2,000 bids submitted last year. The Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers previously said it was reviewing the non-English bids first. expects additional approvals in the coming weeks.

Winning bidders must now work out contractual and other details. The new suffixes could be available for use as early as the middle of the year.

Proponents of the new suffixes hope the expansion will lead to online neighborhoods of businesses and groups around specific geographic areas or industries and help non-English speakers avoid typing English domain names like ".com."

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More information: gtldresult.icann.org

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User comments : 2

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phiumetta
5 / 5 (1) Mar 23, 2013
I am assuming they mean non-ascii. After all, .es , .de , .se &c are all 'non-english'
nkalanaga
not rated yet Mar 24, 2013
Phiumetta: My thought as well.

Why would a "non-English speaker" have problems typing ".com"? That's four keystrokes, using labeled keys, in an alphabet recognized, if not used, worldwide. Also, as far as I know, "com", by itself, is not an English word.

Yes, I can see why users of other writing systems would like to have their own domains, and I have no problems with that. But the article seems to confuse "speakers of English" and "writers of the Roman alphabet".

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