Hubble observes the hidden depths of Messier 77

Mar 28, 2013
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this vivid image of spiral galaxy Messier 77 -- a galaxy in the constellation of Cetus, some 45 million light-years away from us. The streaks of red and blue in the image highlight pockets of star formation along the pinwheeling arms, with dark dust lanes stretching across the galaxy's starry center. The galaxy belongs to a class of galaxies known as Seyfert galaxies, which have highly ionized gas surrounding an intensely active center. Credit: NASA, ESA

(Phys.org) —The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this vivid image of spiral galaxy Messier 77, one of the most famous and well-studied galaxies in the sky. The patches of red across this image highlight pockets of star formation along the pinwheeling arms, with dark dust lanes stretching across the galaxy's energetic center.

Messier 77 is a galaxy in the constellation of Cetus, some 45 million light-years away from us. Also known as NGC 1068, it is one of the most famous and well-studied galaxies. It is a real star among galaxies, with more papers written about it than many other galaxies put together!

Despite its current fame and striking swirling appearance, the galaxy has been a victim of mistaken identity a couple of times; when it was initially discovered in 1780, the distinction between and galaxies was not known, causing finder Pierre Mechain to miss its true nature and label it as a nebula. It was misclassified again when it was subsequently listed in the Messier Catalogue as a .

Now, however, it is firmly categorised as a barred , with loosely wound arms and a relatively small central bulge. It is the closest and brightest example of a particular class of galaxies known as Seyfert galaxies—galaxies that are full of hot, highly ionised gas that glows brightly, emitting .

Strong radiation like this is known to come from the heart of Messier 77—caused by a very active black hole that is around 15 million times the mass of our Sun. Material is dragged towards this black hole and circles around it, heating up and glowing strongly. This region of a galaxy alone, although comparatively small, can be tens of thousands of times brighter than a typical galaxy.

Although no competition for the intense centre, Messier 77's are also very bright regions. Dotted along each arm are knotty red clumps—a signal that new stars are forming. These shine strongly, ionising nearby gas which then glows a deep red colour as seen in the image above. The dust lanes stretching across this image appear as a rusty, brown-red colour due to a phenomenon known as reddening; the dust absorbs more blue light than red light, enhancing its apparent redness.

A version of this image won second place in the Hubble's Hidden Treasures Image Processing Competition, entered by contestant Andre van der Hoeven.

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vidyunmaya
1 / 5 (3) Mar 29, 2013
Sub: Necessity-demand- curiosity- Sustain
Promote the Spirit of Scientific Research with an index for progress.Where lies the Drive and Dynamic Spirit ?
Simply producing an image does not help astronomy to catch-up with Cosmology studies -leave alone the origins that require East West interaction in right earnest.
NGC 1068,at 45 M lY is a beutiful image . Then What next ?
Fleetfoot
5 / 5 (1) Mar 30, 2013
This is a site intended to engage laymen (and make money from advertising) so in this case it's a pretty picture to catch the eye but with a brief explanation identifying the classification of the galaxy morphology. Those who are interested will find out what a "barred spiral" is, and perhaps even seek to learn about Seyfert galaxies. That's as much as such a site can hope for.

http://en.wikiped...l_galaxy

http://en.wikiped...t_galaxy

East-west cooperation in astronomy is already a fact, if you look at the names on astronomical papers, they are truly international in many cases.