Emergency immobiliser for accident victims

Mar 06, 2013

The Centre for Applied Research Tecnalia Research & Innovation has through its FIK initiative designed Varstiff, a smart textile material that can adopt different shapes; when vacuum is applied to it, it turns rigid once again and achieves hardness equivalent to that of a conventional plastic. The material reverts to its flexible state once the vacuum is released. The first product Varstiff will be used for will be an emergency immobiliser for accident victims. Thanks to the encouragement and collaboration of Janus Development, this product has been selected by the Botín Foundation as one of the three award-winning projects in the first edition of its programme "Mind the Gap". To support its launch onto the market a new technology-based enterprise will be set up to operate in the healthcare sector initially, but with plans to expand its activity to other sectors like the automotive or leisure sectors.

The new material designed by Tecnalia can be adapted to any part of the body and in any situation; it can be fitted in its soft, malleable state so that afterwards when vacuum is applied to it, it becomes as stiff as plaster of Paris. This makes it possible in the event of an accident to immediately immobilise parts of the victim's body that are difficult to access without moving it, like the neck, back or thorax.

The funding of 350,000 euros over two years provided by the Botín Foundation through its "Mind the Gap" programme will enable the development of the first two products to be completed: an immobiliser for emergencies, and a position fixator to improve the life quality of people who have to use wheel chairs. The new enterprise is expected to be up and running by the end of 2013 and is expected to launch its first product onto the market early in 2014. Its headquarters will be located in the Basque Country and it is estimated that it will achieve an accumulated turnover of 2 million euros during the first four years it is operating.

Other solutions

This revolutionary material also offers solutions in other spheres of healthcare, like orthopaedics, where it has advantages over ordinary solutions that use elastic straps that are closed using Velcro, or inflatable cushions. These solutions apply pressure and therefore exert force on the skin; and apart from lacking the necessary stiffness, they reduce comfort.

The automotive sector, leisure and sports are other fields in which this material can have new uses to ensure the safety and comfort of its users. In the automotive sector this material will contribute greater comfort and personalisation of different items, like seats that can be adjusted to each person, systems for absorbing energy in doors, or flexible luggage racks. In the sphere of sports, it could lead to flexible items for camping like chairs, tables, mats, etc. Likewise, this material could have a pioneering role in the development of high-performance protection textiles, like for example, clothing for extreme sports or for security personnel.

Explore further: Student designs and develops revolutionary new hand-held laminating tool

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ecotechnology for the smart cities

Dec 01, 2011

This alliance is generating a knowledge base on cities and ecotechnology; it will gradually be joined by various Basque and international organisations and companies capable of coming up with innovative solutions underpinned ...

Nissan demos self-healing Scratch Shield iPhone case

Jan 17, 2012

Nissan today announced the latest piece of must-have kit for the iPhone - a ground-breaking self-healing iPhone case. The Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case features the brand's pioneering self-healing paint ...

Smart fabrics, the new black

Oct 15, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Smart fabrics and intelligent textiles – material that incorporates cunning molecules or clever electronics – is thriving and European research efforts are tackling some of the sector’s ...

Recommended for you

EDAG car with textile skin set for Geneva show

21 hours ago

Making its debut at the Geneva Motor Show 2015 is the EDAG Light Cocoon. This is promoted as a new dimension for lightweight construction, a sportscar with a textile outer skin panel. The EDAG Light Cocoon ...

Stanford aims to bring player pianos back to life

Dec 17, 2014

(AP)—Stanford University wants to unlock the secrets of the player piano, which brought recorded music into living rooms long before there were cassettes, compact discs or iPods.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

NotAsleep
not rated yet Mar 07, 2013
This already exists... we've used this technology for years on ski patrol to immobilize body parts

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.