Warm spring, continued drought predicted for US (Update)

March 21, 2013
The sun sets behind the downtown Kansas City, Mo. skyline as above average temperatures returned to the region Thursday, March 14, 2013. Government forecasters say much of the United States can expect a warm spring and persistent drought. The National Weather Service said Thursday, March 21, 2013 above-normal temperatures are predicted across most of the Lower 48 states and northern Alaska. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Government forecasters say much of the United States can expect a warm spring and persistent drought.

The National Weather Service said Thursday above-normal temperatures are predicted across most of the Lower 48 states and northern Alaska. The forecast also calls for little relief for the drought-stricken Midwest and Southwest. Currently, half the country is experiencing moderate to exceptional drought.

Late snowmelt will bring a threat of river flooding along the upper Mississippi. North Dakota is at the most risk of flooding from the Red River.

A cooler spring is predicted for the Pacific Northwest and northern Great Plains. Drier-than-normal conditions are on tap for the West and Gulf Coast. Hawaii is expected to be cooler and drier than usual.

The spring outlook covers April, May and June.

Explore further: Melting snow threatens spring flooding in north

More information: www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2013/20130321_springoutlook.html

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hooch
3.4 / 5 (12) Mar 21, 2013
Given that the norm this time of the year for PA should be about 59 and it's been under 35 consistently so far, it would be welcomed.
deepsand
2.2 / 5 (13) Mar 21, 2013
You must either be speaking of something other than the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania or have lived here for but a short period of time.
anti-geoengineering
1.6 / 5 (7) Mar 22, 2013
Because of aerosols/geoengineering...traps heat in the lower atmosphere while they are reflecting solar radiation and light back out into space. Idiots.
Howhot
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 26, 2013
So it looks like a dry warm spring for us in the lower 48. Given global warming and the continued dangerous and dramic rise in CO2 levels, its not only expected, but is part of the new normal. Get used to it. 100F summers temps are only months away. Buy your air-conditioners while they are cheap!

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