Cryptozoology? No need for an apology

Mar 15, 2013 by Dustin Welbourne, The Conversation
Claims of mysterious creature sightings dominate cryptozoology – but where is the evidence? Credit: Chi-Yun

All forms of science are reliant on facts, hard evidence and statistics to maintain relevance and credibility. But what of the legitimacy of the so-called "pseudosciences"?

A warning: I'm going to pick on cryptozoology here – the study of hidden, extinct or mythical creatures.

Creatures dear to the cryptozoologist's heart include: the kraken, ogopogo, Nessie, the chupacabra, yowies, mermaids, orang pendek, and the coolest of them all, the Mongolian Death Worm. If you're interested in these and others, will keep you busy for hours.

Despite the (lack of) plausibility, one of the main criticisms levelled at scientists is that we won't investigate cryptozoologists' claims. As Australian cryptozoologist Rex Gilroy said:

Go and search for the evidence rather than be critical. I have struck a lot academic criticism over the years by people who stick to a textbook and who are glued to their office desk.

Why not go and search?

I can already hear the dull chanting of 's "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence". But this is not why we don't investigate strange ideas.

To publish or not to publish

Scientists consider strange ideas all the time. Indeed, we make up most of them. If we lived by Sagan's mantra, would never happen.

The reason research is not done on extraordinary claims is quite simple: "publish or perish".

Let me explain.

If you want to be a professional scientist, you need to do science. This means formulating questions to answer, doing the research, and then, publishing the work.

As you can imagine, doing research costs money. This means going on bended knee to those holding the purse strings. They evaluate your project and your ability – that is, your published research – to carry out the project.

It is basically a catch-22 situation. Without a good publishing history, you will likely not get funded. But you can't do much research without the funding. And around we go.

Hence the phrase, publish or perish.

You would think then that making a big discovery would be great for a scientific career. It absolutely is!

Why do researchers publish their work? Credit: Alma Swan

No scientist, ever, would turn down discovering a new species, especially something such as Bigfoot. It would be an instant publication in a major journal, and research funding would flow like the Amazon River.

As such, scientists are not shying away from strange claims because they don't want to make discoveries. They shy away because of the plausibility and probability of making the discovery.

Bigfoot sightings in Northern America – seems like you can’t go outside without running into him. Credit: Mangani's Bigfoot Maps

Let's take Bigfoot as an example.

Bigfoot, a 500-kilo bipedal primate standing 3.0 metres, is biologically possible. Other than the bipedal locomotion, a primate from South-eastern Asia, gigantopithecus, would have fit the bill – if it hadn't gone extinct 100,000 years ago.

But given biogeography and population biology, such a species is not plausible.

Bigfoot's biggest bunions are his biggest supporters, the Bigfoot hunters. Sightings of the creature have come from all over North America.

Yet any species with a huge distribution would consist of a large number of individuals, and therefore, we would have plenty of physical evidence.

Proponents justify this lack of evidence by claiming Bigfoot is low in numbers, and they bury their dead, and …

Whoa Nelly! You're telling me in a country where there are 88 guns for every 100 people no one has shot and recovered the body.

Until 2009, there were no sightings of pygmy hippos in all of Australia, nevertheless a NT hunter managed to shoot one.

You can't have it both ways. The Bigfoot population cannot stretch across North America enabling sightings every other Tuesday, and be in such low numbers that solid evidence never materialises.

In Bigfoot's case, scientists don't look because he is simply not plausible.

Dealing with claims

Not all claims are in this canoe though. If tomorrow's newspaper headline was: "Panther found in Australia", I wouldn't be surprised.

Wildlife trafficking is one of the three largest crimes in the world and large cats are certainly on the price list. If you do a search of "exotic" animals in Australia, you quickly realise Australia is not immune from the industry.

Regardless of whether animals are being kept legally or illegally, escapes can and do happen. In 2008, a 1.5 metre alligator was found in Pambula, on the south coast of New South Wales.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
he ‘rediscovered’ yellow-spotted bell frog in NSW.

Though a big cat living in Australia is as plausible as a hippo or alligator, to commit research time and funding to finding it is too much of a gamble.

If one could be found, great! But what if nothing is found? Years could pass without finding a thing – and that translates to not publishing a thing.

And for a scientist, that's game over.

Cryptozoologists shouldn't be too concerned. Scientists are doing research all over Australia: if strange critters are out there, they will be detected incidentally.

At the end of the day, it's encouraging that passionate, amateur zoologists are out looking for animals. I, for one, would rather they look for Bigfoot than sit at home watching Big Brother. And if they find solid evidence, a scientist will always be keen to have a look.

When it comes to scientists conducting research, it boils down to a simple calculation that everyone recognises:

What do we spend our finite resources on?

Odd animals may exist, but there are certainly many that need our attention now. And in the meantime, let's see what else we come across.

Explore further: Rescued 'abandoned' penguin chicks survival similar to colony rates

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Tausch
1.5 / 5 (8) Mar 15, 2013
No prior geometry. No prior order. No prior disorder.
Then take the following statement literally:
Assume nothing.

From there, from nothing, it's all science.
Jeddy_Mctedder
2.1 / 5 (7) Mar 15, 2013
years ago i read an acvount of someone claiming to have observed a giant elephant with a giant skull protrusion/bulbous forehead in southeast asia. fossils of giant elephant species had been found in that region. it was said that account may have wirnessed the death of the last remaining elephant of that particular species. literally witnessing an extinction.

can it be that unlikely such a witness actually occured. it would seem rafe and unlikely, perhaps even the animal obsereved was just a normal forest elephant with acromegally rather than the last of a dying species.

we will never know.
wiyosaya
3 / 5 (6) Mar 15, 2013
Whoa Nelly! You're telling me in a country where there are 88 guns for every 100 people no one has shot and recovered the body.
IMHO, this is a pseudo-scientific statement at best from some "scientist" claiming a scientific argument against BF, and this statement is no more scientific than the people from the BFRO make in their completely unscientific TV show, "Finding Bigfoot,"

There's a squatch in these woods
when there is no shred of evidence that is even remotely scientific that supports the BFRO researcher's claim.

Why not extend this "scientist's" statement this way:

If there's a squatch in these woods, it surely would have been shot due to the fact that the number of guns in the US is equivalent to 88 percent of the population.

Why not? Because it is pseudo-science.

I really wish "scientists" would stop using pseudo-scientific arguments to discredit pseudo-scientists. IMHO, it does nothing to further true science.
Tausch
1.9 / 5 (9) Mar 15, 2013
Science does not use the word 'never' literally.
Tausch
2.1 / 5 (9) Mar 15, 2013
More scientific and less scientific. What is the unit of measure?
antialias_physorg
3.9 / 5 (7) Mar 15, 2013
It is basically a catch-22 situation. Without a good publishing history, you will likely not get funded. But you can't do much research without the funding.

Which is not entirely true. Most research institutions (and many companies..IBM, SONY, and even the sub-100-people company I work at) will invest in highly speculative stuff as fun side projects (you never know...although these projects usually don't go anywhere IF they pay off the payoff can be huge).
Of course such projects aren't going to get the budget of the LHC out of the box. But if they produce results then funding for further pursuits can and will be found.

They shy away because of the plausibility and probability of making the discovery.

Well of course. Who wants to be remembered as the guy who spent his life producing no results (or more likely in that case: forgotten)?
You research what interests you. But job satisfaction and self esteem in science ONLY comes from producing REPRODUCIBLE results.
julianpenrod
1 / 5 (9) Mar 15, 2013
Actually, the map of Bigfoot sightings isn't complete, it's more a list of monthly reports. In fact, there are many, many more reports even than the points on the map. And there are websites that will give the locations of monthly reports of Bigfoot activity. As well as UFO activity. And, in fact, if you look at them, you'll see the two coincide almost identically!
I tried submitting an article to magazines like Fate pointing out that the most famous anomalous events, from the Jersey Devil to the Winchester House to the Dover Demon, Mothman, Philadelphia Experiment, Lizzy Borden crime, Oregon Vortex, Champ, JFK shooting, September 11 events, Skunk Ape and Judge Crater disappearance, among others, fell in a well defined region of the country. They all fell outside the area generally referred to as the Great Plains. I suggested that this is because that area is lacking in psychic energy, That maybe UFO's even run on psychic energy.
antialias_physorg
4.2 / 5 (12) Mar 15, 2013
And, in fact, if you look at them, you'll see the two coincide almost identically!

You know: if you just take a map of the united states population density it pretty much fits with the sightings map.
http://www.mapofu...-map.gif
OMG! They coincide almost identically! (/sarcasm)

Before I'd theorize about 'psychic energy', I'd theorize that:
"The percentage of gullible fools in the US is evenly distributed"

Makes a lot more sense, doesn't it?

Or we could go with Mitch Hedberg:
I think Bigfoot is blurry, that's the problem. It's not the photographer's fault. Bigfoot is blurry, and that's extra scary to me. There's a large, out-of-focus monster roaming the countryside.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.7 / 5 (7) Mar 15, 2013
Heres one such animal
http://www.tvpart...rtie.gif

Heres another one:
http://andreaross...ture.jpg

Both are scary.
julianpenrod
1.7 / 5 (11) Mar 15, 2013
The article claims that two primary reasons for "scientists" not examining claims of the paranormal is that "carry out 'experimentation' is too expensive" and "'scientists' want to carry out 'experiments' that are likely to bring discoveries". Among other things, the cost is not a factor.'"Science", for example, regularly dismisses images of Jesus and the Blessed Mother on walls of underpasses or tree trunks or tortillas, characterizing them as simple pareidolia. But not once, ever, have they ever proved that. It's offered, they will claim if cornered, as a "possibility", but it is pronounced with all the conclusiveness of an absolute, indisputable fact. And, yet, no "scientist" has ever examined possibilities for pareidolia. Not once did they ever do an examination to show that faces or forms other than Christ or The Blessed Mother are formed accidentally. And how much does it cost to fry up even a few hundred tortillas? They don't want it proved the appearances are real!
julianpenrod
1.4 / 5 (11) Mar 15, 2013
Despite antalias physorg's combativeness, the population of New Mexico is about the same as Montana, but New Mexico has Roswell, the Lonnie Zamora sighting, the first atomic blast and Dulce. And, as I said, the map only shows one month's reporting. In fact, there are many more sightings of Bigfoot and UFO's in New Mexico than throughout the rest of the Great Plains. Fewer people will report seeing the moon in sparsely populated areas, but does that mean the moon doesn't exist? And, before being so dismissive, antalias physorg might consider that the lack of natural psychic energy in the Great Plains may be the cause for people tending not to settle there. Why should the Great Plains be as sparsely settled as the southern portion of the mountainous Rockies? And, too, the lack of population in the Great Plains doesn't explain why they have no distinctive perennial features like California's Boonville, or Louisiana's reptile people, or the Cahokian mounds, or the Marfa Lights.
wiyosaya
4.2 / 5 (5) Mar 15, 2013
They don't want it proved the appearances are real!

Please correct me if I am wrong, however, I assume by "they" you mean scientists.

As much as it may seem otherwise, I am open to the possibility that there are all kinds of things as yet unknown to science because, if you follow discoveries, there are things, like previously unknown to science species, discovered regularly.

As well, if you ever saw the series "Monster Quest,"(http://www.histor...erquest) at least some of the questers were considered legitimate scientists in the appropriate field.

However, I often hear what sounds like conspiracy theories from pseudo-scientists like what you propose above - that is, scientists do not want "put your favorite legend here" proved real.

Personally, I think any scientist studying the appropriate field, would love irrefutable scientific proof of a discovery in their field of any "legendary" item. True scientists never close themselves off to such discoveries.
Tausch
2 / 5 (8) Mar 15, 2013
Who wants to be remembered ...AP


The postulate is: There was someone behind the object labeled 'wheel'. Many will say "Does that matter?"
Claudius
1.8 / 5 (10) Mar 15, 2013
"Why do researchers publish their work?"

This graph made me sad. The reasons:
"Communicate suits to peers
Advance career
Personal prestige
Gain funding
Financial reward"

None of the reasons have anything at all to do with science.

There should have been: "Search for truth" or "Read God's blueprints." But, no, only the mechanics of the scientific establishment are mentioned. Sad.

Shootist
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 15, 2013
Heres one such animal
http://www.tvpart...rtie.gif

Both are scary.


"Please state the nature of the medical emergency?"
antialias_physorg
2.4 / 5 (7) Mar 15, 2013
There should have been: "Search for truth" or "Read God's blueprints."

Erm. We're talking about scientists here. The notion of being a serious scientist and 'belief in god' are pretty much mutually exclusive.

And 'truth' is a fallacy that anyone with much less brainpower than a scientist will know isn't there to find. That's just an abstract notion with no connection to reality.

One thing people SHOULD take home from the graph, though (and one thing that gets consistently misrepresented here by some people who know a negative amount about science and scientists): Scientists aren't in it for the money.

hylozoic
1.6 / 5 (7) Mar 15, 2013
Cryptozoology is like atheism -- both get a bad name from their 'fans'. There's plenty of scientifically rigorous work going on by private individuals, those with backing from universities, et cetera in the 'field' of cryptozoology. They just don't get much attention (outside of fortean circles). For instance, Chupacabras is no longer taken seriously in cryptozoology as the source claim reasonably seems to have come from an attention-seeking human (in Puerto Rico, Madelyne Tolentino, in 1995) who had just seen the film Species. Her 'witness' testimony to the event pretty much describes the beast that HR Giger designed for the film. Benjamin Radford, the researcher who wrote this as an article for Fortean Times, later expanded it into a book. Also, the history of the larger (eg giant) squids is a history that passes through the lands of folklore, natural history, myth, and hard science. They exist, and are as fascinating as 'all get out'! Biophiliacs and Forteans both love cryptozoology
wiyosaya
2.8 / 5 (4) Mar 15, 2013
One thing people SHOULD take home from the graph, though (and one thing that gets consistently misrepresented here by some people who know a negative amount about science and scientists): Scientists aren't in it for the money.


Personally, I found that interesting.

To play devil's advocate, "Advance Career," "Personal Prestige," and "Gain Funding," in my opinion, are dubious reasons for publication that may also result in financial gain and open the door to cooked results.

As I see it, the only "right" reason is to "Communicate Results to Peers." I understand, though, that because of today's climate, research is published for reasons that might be considered less than ideal. Unfortunate, that is, in my opinion.
wiyosaya
3 / 5 (4) Mar 15, 2013
Also, the history of the larger (eg giant) squids is a history that passes through the lands of folklore, natural history, myth, and hard science. They exist, and are as fascinating as 'all get out'!

A perfect example of a "legendary" creature just recently documented while still alive. Before that, we knew they must exist since carcasses washed ashore in various places; however, science had not yet seen them in their native habitat.
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (6) Mar 15, 2013
Personal prestige doesn't gain you money. Neither does it if you gain funding. You can secure zero dollars or a billion in funding: your salary as a scientist won't be affected by one cent either way. Pay scales are fixed.

Advancement in career does help in getting more pay.
But usually the only step you can make is from post doc to professor (getting to the head of a department, which might - but usually doesn't - mean more money is not something you get to achieve through publications. That's politics.)

Seriously: if you know what you are getting paid for as post-doc (which is almost nothing) then getting to be professor is more of a bare survival necessity than anything else. It's the only way to financially survive if you want to be a career scientist.

"Communicate Results to Peers."

We had a rule: No paper - no conference. And I know many other institutions have that rule, too. And it is at conferences where you meet others and exchange ideas.
Silverhill
5 / 5 (6) Mar 15, 2013
@julianpenrod
And, before being so dismissive, antalias physorg might consider that the lack of natural psychic energy in the Great Plains may be the cause for people tending not to settle there.
He, and others, might better consider dismissing unsupported claims of even the existence of psychic energy, before worrying about the alleged geographic distribution thereof.

Please present duly attested, unbiased information about this energy; it would be fascinating!
antialias_physorg
3.5 / 5 (8) Mar 15, 2013
Well, there is a definite shortage unicorns in the midwest...so he may be on to something.
julianpenrod
1 / 5 (9) Mar 15, 2013
Silverhill claims my positing a lack of psychic energy in the Great Plains is "unsupported". So is Newton's gravity until actual gram by gram weighings of the planets. In fact, there is support, namely, the curious lack of human presence there. But it's more than that. It can be argued that transient phenomena like Bigfoot intrusion of UFO traversals can be rendered less notable by fewer observers. But perennial phenomena, things that are there constantly or are parts of well known history, are there, and eventually noted, even by sparse populations. And the Great Plains have anomalously few, even no, perennial phenomena. The rest of the country has Mel's Hole; Flight 800; the Texas University tower sniper; Jeffrey Dahmer; the Manson family; Dinosaur National Monument; Meteor Crater; the flight path attributed to the Columbia; the Battle of Los Angeles; Florida's "ghost hill"; the old city of Seattle, covered by the modern one, the Flatwoods Monster, the Kecksburg UFO.
julianpenrod
1.4 / 5 (10) Mar 15, 2013
Also, among other things, there are no Superbowl winning teams that came from the region of minimal Bigfoot presence and UFO activity, and only one president came from around that area, Ford, who was never elected but assume the presidency after Nixon resigned.
Also, a point can be made, what guarantee do "scientists" have that paranormal events might not produce significant benefits to mankind, if examined? By ignoring the paranormal, for whatever reason, they can be passing up things that could be of enormous value to humanity. So much for any supposed interest in the welfare of mankind!
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.4 / 5 (10) Mar 15, 2013
"Science", for example, regularly dismisses images of Jesus and the Blessed Mother on walls of underpasses or tree trunks or tortillas, characterizing them as simple pareidolia. But not once, ever, have they ever proved that.
Ahaaahaaahaaha stop. There is a ketchup stain here on the table in mcdonalds that looks a lot like Mel Brooks. Who should I call?
And the Great Plains have anomalously few, even no, perennial phenomena.
You are forgetting the badlands, custers massacre, wounded knee, and the Taos hum. And pikes peak.
jsdarkdestruction
3.7 / 5 (6) Mar 15, 2013
Also, among other things, there are no Superbowl winning teams that came from the region of minimal Bigfoot presence and UFO activity, and only one president came from around that area, Ford, who was never elected but assume the presidency after Nixon resigned.
Also, a point can be made, what guarantee do "scientists" have that paranormal events might not produce significant benefits to mankind, if examined? By ignoring the paranormal, for whatever reason, they can be passing up things that could be of enormous value to humanity. So much for any supposed interest in the welfare of mankind!

You know they have medication for people like you now days? PLEASE contact your personal physician and ask for him to suggest a good mental health professional in your area.
julianpenrod
1.4 / 5 (9) Mar 16, 2013
The Taos Hum is in New Mexico; Area 51 is in Nevada; Racetrack Playa is in California; Richard Branson's Spaceport One is in New Mexico; Jimmy Hoffa disappeared near Detroit; the D. B. Cooper affair culminated near the border of Oregon and Washington; the infamous Bohemian Grove is near the Russian River in Washington State; Denver, Colorado sports the paranormally designed Denver Airport; the first powered flight was in North Carolina; Robert Goddard's first liquid fueled rocket took off in Massachusetts; the first atomic pile was assembled in Chicago; Edison worked in New Jersey; John Wayne Gacy carried out his crimes near Chicago. True, for the sheer audacity of the situation, Custer's Last Stand can qualify, but I only said the Great Plains had low amounts of psychic energy, I didn't say they had none.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (2) Mar 16, 2013
Our brains seem to be wired to find this sort of stuff to be attractive, convincing. Thanks to the discipline of science, we are becoming more free from these sorts of harmful (to various degrees) beliefs. We no longer, for instance, sacrifice animals to ensure good hunting, or burn witches to keep bad things from happening (at least not in the developed world).

Unfortunately, the popularity of pseudo-science in media indicates work remains yet to be done (e.g. "psychic energy").
antialias_physorg
3.5 / 5 (11) Mar 16, 2013
What never fails to amaze is how people like julin ever found a scienece sizte...nay...even stick around to post. What's the point? he doesn't understand the most basic tenets of science (repeatability and falsifiability).
Can someone really be that deluded? I think he's just trolling at this point.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.4 / 5 (10) Mar 16, 2013
The Taos Hum is in New Mexico; Area 51 is in Nevada; Racetrack Playa is in California; Richard Branson's Spaceport One is in New Mexico; Jimmy Hoffa disappeared near Detroit; the D. B. Cooper affair culminated near the border of Oregon and Washington; the infamous Bohemian Grove is near the Russian River in Washington State; Denver, Colorado sports the paranormally designed Denver Airport
Close enough.
What never fails to amaze is how people like julin ever found a scienece sizte...nay...even stick around to post. What's the point? he doesn't understand
Often they will misspell psychic in a google search and end up here. Hey Julian - astrology and astronomy are not the same things did you know it?

Also - chemtrails are everywhere. And the Taos hum can be heard all the way up in Britain.
PhyOrgSux
3.2 / 5 (9) Mar 16, 2013
The Taos Hum is in New Mexico...


These sort of (and many other psychic) "phenomena" tell more about the people in those locations than we can share without being insulting.

TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (8) Mar 16, 2013
The Taos hum is actually the signature of nuclear-powered earth borers which have been creating vast underground networks of habitats totally isolated from, and independent of, the surface, the Purpose of which being to ensure the survival of humanity in the face of global pandemic, nuclear war, and similar catastrophe.

They began in the southwest with operation plowshare activity and have since extended north and east, and beneath the atlantic, with associated reports of this 'hum'. They are interim solutions until independent colonies can be established off-planet. One such habitat does in fact exist beneath the Denver airport, another at dulce. They're all over the place

The aborted SSC construction was done to mask similar operations further down and close to densely-populated areas. Ditto with the NYC water tunnel project.

Nothing supernatural about that is there? Only prudence and common sense.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (8) Mar 16, 2013
The LHC construction provided a similar such cover for tunneling and cavity creation beneath France and Switzerland.

I personally am glad to know that we have Leaders, working safely beyond the realm of public scrutiny, who possess the foresight and the initiative and the power to do those things necessary to safeguard the future of the species. Things which no other govt or alliance would have the will or the power to do. Because the people would simply never support it.

Hail Empire.
julianpenrod
1.7 / 5 (11) Mar 16, 2013
Another New World Order non argument technique, in addition to such things as mockery to appeal to the trenchant and depraved, getting the last word. The NWO seeks the ilk of individual who think that, just because devotees of the lie continue talking, placing comment and comment, even if it has no more substance than just simple mockery or saying, "Well, I still don't believe you", then their side much be right. So you will see comment after comment after comment condemning what I say but adding absolutely nothing to the discussion. No explanations for phenomena, no attempt at actually testing it, just denying it because that serves the lie that the conventional is necessarily all there is. They don't disagree with the paranormal, they hate it for talking about things they don't want the "rank and file" to know about. Such devotion to mockery comes not from actual consideration of a subject, but from wholesale, wanton, rabid hate.
jsdarkdestruction
3.5 / 5 (8) Mar 16, 2013
What never fails to amaze is how people like julin ever found a scienece sizte...nay...even stick around to post. What's the point? he doesn't understand the most basic tenets of science (repeatability and falsifiability).
Can someone really be that deluded? I think he's just trolling at this point.

I'm torn on this one too. Can someone really be that crazy? how can he possibley function day to day? do mental instututions now allow internet access to patients? Having been subjected to his previous posts on other topics we know he's really far out, but this seems over the top even for him. i think he might just be trolling us too. in fact, a part of me kind of hopes so, because otherwise he is a great disservice to our species, his existence makes us all look bad. hopefully he hasnt passed on his genes and this eyesore will be one generational.
Silverhill
5 / 5 (5) Mar 16, 2013
Silverhill claims my positing a lack of psychic energy in the Great Plains is "unsupported".
So it is, unless and until you can give independent, reliable support (for which I asked, but which you have yet to offer).

So is Newton's gravity until actual gram by gram weighings of the planets.
Wrong. Gravitational phenomena are continuously (and measurably) on display right here. Finding the exact masses of everything in the universe is not necessary before being able to claim good support for the theory.

In fact, there is support, namely, the curious lack of human presence there.
[old joke]
"Why do you wear sunglasses indoors?"
"It keeps the elephants away."
"But there are no elephants around here!"
"See? It works!"
Silverhill
5 / 5 (6) Mar 16, 2013
It can be argued that transient phenomena like Bigfoot intrusion of UFO traversals can be rendered less notable by fewer observers.
It can also be argued that such phenomena are not so notable because they are not so real. Occam's razor, sir.

So you will see comment after comment after comment condemning what I say but adding absolutely nothing to the discussion. No explanations for phenomena, no attempt at actually testing it...
Pot, meet kettle.

They don't disagree with the paranormal, they hate it for talking about things they don't want the "rank and file" to know about.
I don't hate the paranormal; I just dispute its existence. Hard evidence would well serve your case. Got any?
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.2 / 5 (6) Mar 16, 2013
Silverhill claims my positing a lack of psychic energy in the Great Plains is "unsupported".
Grok this: why is it the great plains? Where are all the TREES huh? Why are there no TREES on the great plains?

Did the Indians just burn them all to provide more grazing space for their buffalos or did tornados suck them all up or did ALIENS harvest them for their wood-burning hyperdrives?

I think you are ignoring the biggest, most supernatural metaphysical mystery of all which is slapping you right in your FACE.
Gino
3 / 5 (4) Mar 17, 2013
Mermaids certainly exist not swimming in the Rhine guarding the gold but infants born with both legs fused together.
Whydening Gyre
1.6 / 5 (7) Mar 17, 2013
Well, there is a definite shortage unicorns in the midwest...so he may be on to something.

It's cuz I'm wearing sunglasses...

And - with all this tunneling going on - where they puttin' all that dirt?
frajo
1.8 / 5 (5) Mar 18, 2013
We no longer, for instance, sacrifice animals to ensure good hunting, or burn witches to keep bad things from happening (at least not in the developed world).

The vocabulary has changed. We now sacrifice "collateral damages" to keep profits soaring. We in the developed world, the victims in the developing world.
Silverhill
not rated yet Mar 18, 2013
julianpenrod: for various (mundane, non-paranormal) reasons, the Great Plains region is not densely populated.
Since psychic energy presumably needs psyches in order to exist -- and I seriously doubt that grass, dirt, and rocks possess psyches -- could it be that there is not much psychic energy there BECAUSE there are not many psyches there? (Perhaps you have your correlation backward?)