Next generation of bio-based binders to be developed

March 19, 2013

The Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN) at the University of Waterloo and a biomaterials company started by two Waterloo chemistry graduates are teaming together to make the next generation of biolatex binders for applications in paper coating, paperboard and personal care products.

The secret of EcoSynthetix's breakthrough is to replace traditional latex with a nano-engineered version that is derived from bio-based sources, such as the starch in corn or tapioca. The applications are diverse. For example, latex made from is currently used as the main in coating paper for everything from magazines to cereal boxes. With biolatex-containing coatings, the same paper can be made with equal or superior performance, at a lower cost and with a smaller .

EcoSynthetix Corp. and WIN will share expertise in developing and characterizing nanopolymers and other new bio-based materials. The result is anticipated to lead to a new generation of bio-based latex coatings that are suitable for a wide variety of industrial applications.

"By sharing our research skills and insights, WIN researchers will help develop green bio-based materials that have a real impact on society," said Professor Arthur J. Carty, executive director of the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology. "This project represents a great opportunity for our institute, faculty and students at the university to collaborate with a local innovator to further our understanding of technology that leverages a to produce innovative substitutes for petroleum-based chemicals."

"This collaboration with the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology is a great example of how industry and universities can work together to advance an exciting new area of science to benefit the community," said John van Leeuwen, CEO of EcoSynthetix. "By working with WIN to deepen our understanding of the basic science, we can identify new future applications that could benefit from a sustainable bio-based material."

Explore further: Scientists discover eco-friendly wood dissolution

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