Asian carp spawning areas wider than expected

March 20, 2013 by John Flesher

A newly released study says Asian carp may be reproducing in more places and for longer periods than previously thought.

That's a bad sign for natural resource managers looking for ways to stop the invasive fish from reaching more rivers and keep them out of the Great Lakes.

Several varieties of have infested the and many of its tributaries. Scientists say they may be out-competing for food.

A Purdue University study released Tuesday says the aggressive fish are spawning in waters that had been considered too narrow or with currents too slow for their offspring to survive.

Scientist Reuben Goforth says it's uncertain whether eggs laid in those outlying areas will survive to adulthood. But he says findings illustrate the carps' ability to adapt.

Explore further: Congressman praises silver carp decision

0 shares

Related Stories

Efforts to close canal to Great Lakes

August 8, 2011

Efforts are underway to try and get the river locks on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal closed in order to stop the spread of two invasive species of fish known as the Asian carp and the Snakehead.

Recommended for you

Genomes uncover life's early history

August 24, 2015

A University of Manchester scientist is part of a team which has carried out one of the biggest ever analyses of genomes on life of all forms.

Rare nautilus sighted for the first time in three decades

August 25, 2015

In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers ...

Why a mutant rice called Big Grain1 yields such big grains

August 24, 2015

(Phys.org)—Rice is one of the most important staple crops grown by humans—very possibly the most important in history. With 4.3 billion inhabitants, Asia is home to 60 percent of the world's population, so it's unsurprising ...

Study shows female frogs susceptible to 'decoy effect'

August 28, 2015

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers has found that female túngaras, frogs that live in parts of Mexico and Central and South America, appear to be susceptible to the "decoy effect." In their paper published in the journal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.