Ark. police photograph license plates, store data

Mar 02, 2013 by Jeannie Nuss

(AP)—Little Rock may not be a likely terrorism target or a gang crime hotspot, but the Arkansas capital is following the example of high-security cities by expanding electronic surveillance of its streets.

A police car with a device that photographs moves through the city and scans the traffic on the streets, relaying the data it collects to a computer for sifting. Police say the surveillance helps identify stolen cars and drivers with outstanding arrest warrants.

It also allows authorities to monitor where average citizens might be at any particular time. That bothers some residents, as well as groups that oppose public intrusions into individual privacy. The groups are becoming more alarmed about license plate tracking as a growing number of acquire the technology.

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Maggnus
3.7 / 5 (3) Mar 02, 2013
There's a lot of good in this type of technology, but the downside scares the crap out of me.
Kiwini
1 / 5 (5) Mar 02, 2013
"It also allows authorities to monitor where average citizens might be at any particular time..."

No, this system allows authorities to see where the license plate (and presumably, a vehicle) are located, IF it's publicly viewable. The last time that I checked, hooman beans aren't required to wear license plates.

The bit about downsides & fecal material is painfully true, but how 'bout if the unsubstantiated crap in these articles is proofread, found, and corrected prior to release?.
VendicarE
4 / 5 (1) Mar 03, 2013
Only criminals have a legitimate reason for fearing surveillance.

No one has the right to force other's not to look.
Maggnus
3 / 5 (2) Mar 03, 2013
Only criminals have a legitimate reason for fearing surveillance.

No one has the right to force other's not to look.


I disagree. Both communism and fascism depend on the activities of their citizens being closely monitored. We are not so far removed from either of these reprehensible systems that we should not remain vigilent to their resurrection.