Young dolphin lures pod to safety in Australia

Feb 03, 2013
A man looks at a pod of dolphins in shallow waters at Whalers Cove, on the south coast of Australia, February 2, 2013. A young dolphin has been used to lure a pod of 100 to 150 others to safety after they were in danger of stranding themselves, Australian officials said on February 3.

A young dolphin has been used to lure a pod of 100 to 150 others to safety after they were in danger of stranding themselves, Australian officials said Sunday.

Western Australia's Department of Environment and Conservation said the dolphins were milling in at Whalers Cove near Albany on the south coast and in danger of a mass stranding when found on Saturday.

One dolphin had already died.

Local conservation leader Deon Utber said moved a juvenile dolphin by boat to at high tide on Saturday to entice the others to follow.

"The juvenile was sending out distress signals, which was calling the dolphins in, as soon as it was translocated to deeper waters the pod followed it out and last we saw they were swimming out to sea," he said in a statement.

Officials said there was no sign of the pod by Sunday morning.

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User comments : 5

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Sweetwater Tom
3.7 / 5 (3) Feb 03, 2013
Interesting ethical question: You "kidnapped" a child causing it great distress in order to potentially save a pod. Do ends justify means? I don't know. My congratulations to the rescuers for imagination and accomplishing the rescue.
BSD
2.7 / 5 (9) Feb 03, 2013
Interesting ethical question: You "kidnapped" a child causing it great distress in order to potentially save a pod. Do ends justify means? I don't know. My congratulations to the rescuers for imagination and accomplishing the rescue.


You answered your own question by congratulating the rescuers. I'm just pleased that no more dolphins died. One dying was one too many even if it is natural causes.
Antoweif
1 / 5 (5) Feb 03, 2013
What you are saying BSD, is that growing old and die is the greatest enemy of society today.
Shakescene21
5 / 5 (2) Feb 03, 2013
What a brilliant solution! I wish the article told us more. Did the "wildlife experts" come up with this solution on the spot, or has this been done before?
Anda
5 / 5 (1) Feb 03, 2013
What is hard to understand to me is why an animal so intelligent can behave this way.
I'd really like to know it.

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