Wireless power transfer technology for high capacity transit

Feb 12, 2013
This shows a concept tram. Credit: KAIST

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and the Korea Railroad Research Institute (KRRI) have developed a wireless power transfer technology that can be applied to high capacity transportation systems such as railways, harbor freight, and airport transportation and logistics. The technology supplies 60 kHz and 180 kW of power remotely to transport vehicles at a stable, constant rate.

KAIST and KRRI today successfully showcased the transfer technology to the public by testing it on the railroad tracks at Osong Station in Korea. Originally, this technology was developed as part of an electric vehicle system introduced by KAIST in 2011 known as the On-line Electric Vehicle (OLEV).

This shows the shaped magnetic field in resonance. Credit: KAIST

OLEV does not need to be parked at a charging station to have a fully powered battery. It gets charged while running, idling, and parking, enabling a reduction in size of the reserve battery down to one-fifth of the battery on board a regular electric car. The initial models of OLEV, a bus and a tram, receive 20 kHz and 100 kW power at an 85% rate while maintaining a 20cm air gap between the underbody of vehicle and the . OLEV complies with the national and international standards of 62.5 mG, a safety net for . In July 2013, for the first time since its development, OLEV will run on a regular road, an inner city route in the city of Gumi, requiring 40 minutes of driving each way.

Today's technology demonstration offers further support that OLEV can be utilized for large-scale systems. Professor Dong-Ho Cho, Director of Center for Wireless Power Transfer Technology Business Development at KAIST, explained the recent improvements to OLEV:

"We have greatly improved the OLEV technology from the early development stage by increasing its power transmission density by more than three times. The size and weight of the power pickup modules have been reduced as well. We were able to cut down the production costs for major OLEV components, the power supply, and the pickup system, and in turn, OLEV is one step closer to being commercialized."

If trains receive power wirelessly, the costs of railway wear and tear will be dramatically reduced. There will be no power rails, including electrical poles, required for the establishment of a railway system, and accordingly, lesser space will be needed. Tunnels will be built on a smaller scale, lowering construction costs. In addition, it will be helpful to overcome major obstacles that discourage the construction of high speed railway systems such as noise levels and problems in connecting pantograph and power rails.

KAIST and KRRI plan to apply the wireless power transfer technology to trams in May and high speed trains in September.

Explore further: Qi wireless charging standard offers more design freedom

Related Stories

KAIST's successful transfer of green technology

Dec 01, 2011

Daejeon, Republic of Korea, December 1, 2011—The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has reaped the fruits of its hard work in developing an innovative green technology that will ...

Japan demo shows electricity entering EV through tires

Jul 08, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Electric vehicles' future continues to tease scientists to devise promising and practical ideas to keep these cars moving along the highways without having to pull over and wait for a battery ...

Electric cars get charged wirelessly in London (w/ Video)

Nov 04, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- HaloIPT has recently demonstrated wireless charging of electric vehicles in London using their inductive power transfer technology. The company fitted Citroen electric cars with receiver pads ...

Qualcomm's HaloIPT tech brings wireless charging for EVs

Jan 16, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Qualcomm has demonstrated its new wireless power transmission system for electric vehicles (EVs) at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). The system, including one pad for power transmitting, ...

Recommended for you

Qi wireless charging standard offers more design freedom

6 hours ago

Wireless charging is getting a new technology treatment which offers more design freedom. The Wireless Power Consortium's advance in its Qi wireless charging standard means that phones and chargers will no ...

'Wetting' a battery's appetite for renewable energy storage

11 hours ago

Sun, wind and other renewable energy sources could make up a larger portion of the electricity America consumes if better batteries could be built to store the intermittent energy for cloudy, windless days. Now a new material ...

New system to optimize public lighting power consumption

11 hours ago

In order to meet the efficiency requirements of the latest public lighting regulations, researchers from the School of Industrial Engineers of Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with ...

Many tongues, one voice, one common ambition

Jul 31, 2014

There is much need to develop energy efficient solutions for residential buildings in Europe. The EU-funded project, MeeFS, due to be completed by the end of 2015, is developing an innovative multifunctional and energy efficient ...

Panasonic, Tesla to build big US battery plant

Jul 31, 2014

(AP)—American electric car maker Tesla Motors Inc. is teaming up with Japanese electronics company Panasonic Corp. to build a battery manufacturing plant in the U.S. expected to create 6,500 jobs.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

neversaidit
not rated yet Feb 13, 2013
tesla..?