Supersonic skydiver's records confirmed

Feb 22, 2013
Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner attends the FIS World Cup men's downhill race on January 26, 2013 in Kitzbuehel, Austrian Alps. Baumgartner broke three world records when he jumped from the edge of space in October, the World Air Sports Federation confirmed on Friday.

Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner broke three world records when he jumped from the edge of space in October, the World Air Sports Federation confirmed on Friday.

The Swiss-based federation, also known as the FAI, said Baumgartner notched up the world's maximum vertical speed record, as well as the highest exit altitude and vertical distance of .

The FAI confirmed a final analysis by Baumgartner's team Red Bull Stratos, which said that the 43-year-old reached 1,357.6 kilometres (843.6 miles) an hour, or Mach 1.25, in freefall.

Baumgartner's jump took place last October 14 in Roswell in the US state of New Mexico.

He was first carried up in a pressurised capsule attached to a to an altitude of 38,969.4 metres (127,852.4 feet).

Wearing a specially-designed survival suit, he launched himself to Earth, freefalling 36,402.6 metres before opening his parachute.

"By breaking these world records, Felix adds his names to the list of FAI world record holders which includes prestigious air sport personalities such as Charles Lindbergh, and, more recently, Bertrand Piccard and Steve Fossett," the federation underlined.

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Fabio P_
1 / 5 (1) Feb 22, 2013
Still a waste of precious helium.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (1) Feb 22, 2013
Still a waste of precious helium.
Anda
1 / 5 (1) Feb 23, 2013
The only waste here are the comments above.
Spirit of adventure and going beyond our limits is what makes us humans.

2 similar dumb comments... New weekly nick "waterripples"?

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