Samsung phone battery catches fire, injures man

February 6, 2013

(AP)—South Korean fire officials say a man suffered burns after the battery from a Samsung smartphone caught fire in his trouser pocket.

Officials at Bupyeong Fire Station in Incheon city said Wednesday the lithium-ion battery was not in the phone when it caught fire. Such batteries are quick to charge but prone to overheating.

The man suffered second-degree burns and a one inch wound on his thigh from Saturday's incident.

Chosun Ilbo newspaper reported the battery from the 2011 Galaxy Note exploded but fire officials couldn't confirm that.

Officials declined to identify the man. Samsung said no investigation was planned.

It is the second known time in a year in that a Samsung battery has caught fire.

Lithium-ion batteries are behind the worldwide grounding of Boeing 787s.

Explore further: Toward improving the safety of Lithium-ion batteries

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Grallen
not rated yet Feb 06, 2013
A lithium-ion battery catching fire is news?

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