Russia claims record dive but no monster in deep freeze

February 6, 2013
A snow sculpture of the Loch Ness monster on Brighton beach in England. Russian explorers claimed a record Wednesday in diving to the bottom of a remote lake at the coldest time of the year but said they could not find its most famed inhabitant, a mythical Loch Ness-style monster.

Russian explorers claimed a record Wednesday in diving to the bottom of a remote lake at the coldest time of the year but said they could not find its most famed inhabitant, a mythical Loch Ness-style monster.

The team dived to the bottom of the remote Labynkyr lake in the Yakutia region of in the middle of winter, with the outside temperature minus 45 degrees Celsius (minus 49 Fahrenheit), said in a statement.

The lake is in the region of the Oimyakon village in Yakutia, which is the coldest inhabited place on earth and where temperatures have been known to exceed minus 70 C.

"A has been established. For the first time in history, a human being has carried out a dive in the toughest place on earth at the coldest time of the year," the local Yakutia authorities said in a statement.

They said that the team had gathered unique material about climactic systems in the permafrost region.

The remote lake is shrouded in mystery largely because of reports from a Soviet-era expedition which claimed to have seen a mysterious animal that some believed to be a relic of the dinosaur era.

The episode gave rise to the lake's nickname as the "Russian " after the Scottish loch which is also home to a mythical and so far unconfirmed beast.

The team "did not meet a monster at the bottom of the lake," the Russian Geographical Society said, adding that it was trying to register the achievement in the Guinness Book of Records.

Explore further: Climate change blamed for missing lake

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3 comments

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tadchem
5 / 5 (1) Feb 06, 2013
I don't want to live anywhere that considers ice water temperature to be balmy.
Sean_W
3.7 / 5 (3) Feb 06, 2013
Minus 70 C???

That might be enough to make one's long johns superconduct.
gwrede
5 / 5 (1) Feb 07, 2013
Just checked Oimyakon out on maps.google.com. When I was zooming out, I thought my settings had gone wrong because there was no information, like roads places or borders.

Turned out there simply is nothing there, for hundreds of miles. I'd sure hate to need a doctor over there.

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