Time reversal findings may open doors to the future

Feb 21, 2013 by Evelyn Rabil
Secure Communication with Nonlinear Time-Reversal: This figure demonstrates secure communication of two different UMD images using nonlinear time-reversal of electromagnetic waves (signals); each sent through a complicated wave scattering environment (brown box in the middle). The black boxes represent time-reversed signals that are not reconstructed after being scattered" title="Secure Communication with Nonlinear Time-Reversal: This figure demonstrates secure communication of two different UMD images using nonlinear time-reversal of electromagnetic waves (signals); each sent through a complicated wave scattering environment (brown box in the middle). The black boxes represent time-reversed signals that are not reconstructed after being scattered

(Phys.org)—Imagine a cell phone charger that recharges your phone remotely without even knowing where it is; a device that targets and destroys tumors, wherever they are in the body; or a security field that can disable electronics, even a listening device hiding in a prosthetic toe, without knowing where it is.

While these applications remain only dreams, researchers at the University of Maryland have come up with a sci-fi seeming technology that one day could make them real. Using a time-reversal technique, the team has discovered how to transmit power, sound or images to a nonlinear object without knowing the object's exact location and without affecting objects around it. Their work, "Nonlinear Time Reversal in a Wave Chaotic System," was published in the Feb. 7 issue of the journal.

"That's the magic of time reversal," says Steven Anlage, a university physics professor involved in the project. "When you reverse the 's direction in space and time, it follows the same path it took coming out and finds its way exactly back to the source."

Play it backwards

The time-reversal process is less like living the last five minutes over and more like playing a record backwards, explains Matthew Frazier, a postdoctoral research fellow in the university's physics department. When a signal travels through the air, its waveforms scatter before an antenna picks it up. Recording the received signal and transmitting it backwards reverses the scatter and sends it back as a focused beam in .

"If you go toward a secure building, they won't let you take cell phones," Frazier says, "So instead of checking everyone, they could detect the cell phone and send a lot of energy to to jam it."

What differentiates this research from other time-reversal projects, such as underwater communication, is that it focuses on nonlinear objects such as a cellphone, or even a rusty piece of metal. When the altered, nonlinear frequency of nonlinear objects is recorded, time-reversed and retransmitted, it creates a private communication channel, because other objects cannot understand the signal.

"Time reversal has been around for 10 to 20 years but it requires some pretty sophisticated technology to make it work," Anlage says. "Technology is now catching up to where we are able to use it in some new and interesting ways."

Not only could this nonlinear characteristic secure a wireless communication line, it could prevent transmitted energy from affecting any object but its target. For example, Frazier says, if scientists find a way to tag tumors with chemicals or nanoparticles that react to microwaves in a nonlinear way, doctors could use the technology to direct destructive heat to the errant cells, much like ultrasound is used to break down kidney stones. But unlike ultrasound, which must be directed to a specific location, doctors would not need to know where the tumors were to remove them. Also, the heat treatment would not affect surrounding cells.

Bouncing off the walls

To study time-reversal, the researchers sent a microwave pulse into an enclosed area where waveforms scattered and bounced around inside, as well as off a nonlinear and a linear port. A transceiver then recorded and time-reversed the frequencies the nonlinear port had altered, then broadcast them back into the space. The nonlinear port picked up the time-reversed signal, but the linear port did not.

"Everything we have done has been in very controlled conditions in labs," Frazier says. "It will take more research to figure out how to develop treatments. I'm sure there are other uses we havent thought of."

Explore further: Ultrafast imaging of complex systems in 3D at near atomic resolution nears

More information: prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v110/i6/e063902

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NikFromNYC
2.1 / 5 (7) Feb 21, 2013
The first application of time reversal are so-called http://peswiki.co...t_Motors

"Updated August 2, 2011: As of today, there still are no plans that I know of that surely result in a magnet motor. However, that could change in the next few weeks, as someone has come forward with a design that they are talking about open sourcing. I'm in process of getting those, having a few built to confirm the design, and then publishing the plans.
Also, the number of people I have met who adamantly claim to have built a working all-magnet motor has increased; though I myself still have never seen one myself."
antialias_physorg
4.7 / 5 (12) Feb 21, 2013
natello:
I think you're missing some basic stuff from this article. This has nothing to do with manipulation of time. It is a time-reversal in the sense of using filters for decryption that are the inverse of the ones that are used for encryption. (With the small specialization that these filters work in the time domain)

Nothing is transported backwards in time or time-looped here.

You can imagine it like this (and I know you're going to love this analogy): Start a planar wave and send it towards a set of posts. the wave will be broken up into a chaotic jumble and proceed onward after passnig the 'filter'. The time reverse filter would be one where such a jumble is passed in and a planar wave comes out.

This is usually trivial with linear filters (but linear filters are also easy to attack). But they're using nonlinear filters which are very hard to decrypt by eavesdropping on the transmission.

casualjoe
4.8 / 5 (18) Feb 21, 2013
When scouring the internet to come across somebody saying "science has got it all wrong!!" or "they're ignoring the truth!!" followed by "listen to me, this is the REAL truth!!" you should know by now that it's going to be total bollocks.
casualjoe
5 / 5 (7) Feb 21, 2013
There would be plenty of research jobs to be had within cold fusion or mag motors, if they worked. And if they worked we probably wouldn't need jobs anyway.
djr
5 / 5 (5) Feb 21, 2013
Steorn energy also has a game changing technology that is going to revolutionize our world any day now. If you have some spare cash natello (a few million dollars would be nice) Seán McCarthy would be happy to invest it for you - and any day now you will be the richest person on earth. See - http://pesn.com/2...ng_Orbo/

PESN by the way is the site you must visit if you want to see all the areas of science that are being covered up by "the main stream science"
hemitite
5 / 5 (5) Feb 21, 2013
So using a mag motor would one get somewhere before he left?
Tausch
1.5 / 5 (8) Feb 21, 2013
lol
Consider biology. Human hearing was here first.
You can pick up the sound your ears produce.
Did you think hearing is for listening?

The process described includes sound. The grey box is disgusting.
That is not what our brains look like. Is no one insulted?
Q-Star
3.5 / 5 (8) Feb 21, 2013
PESN by the way is the site you must visit if you want to see all the areas of science that are being covered up by "the main stream science"


They are also a very good source for the latest assessments of the imminent alien (no, not the undocumented worker kind) threat. I would think this is where they should concentrate their "free" energy,,, in this important area. We have a lot more to fear from aliens (no, not the undocumented worker kind) than from mainstream science.

By the By: PESN is the outfit that scooped the world press in reporting the UFO which stealthed it's way in under the recent meteor over Russia.
Sean_W
2 / 5 (7) Feb 21, 2013
I can see how this works for communication since only the focus point gets the message the way it is supposed to be but with power? You may focus energy at the point in space at a specific time but lots of other energy is dispersed, isn't it? Maybe that's fine for jamming phones but for charging them it seems like it might be rather inefficient if I understand what is being done here.
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (4) Feb 21, 2013
I can see how this works for communication since only the focus point gets the message the way it is supposed to be but with power?

Power focussing works this way:

Say you want to transmit a lot of power via a laser (or an ultrasonic pulse sequence), but the power density would burn up your transmission medium (biological tissue en route to the target). So you put the laser through such a nonlinear filter in a way that along the path the EM part of the photons mostly cancel out via destructive interference (e.g. by having the filter phase-shift part of the photons in the beam)
At the destination the nanoparticles time-reverse the process (with an inverse filter that shifts the out-of-phase photons back and recreate the laser.

BAM - tumor fried. With no damage to surrounding tissue.
frajo
1.7 / 5 (6) Feb 21, 2013
It's an attention whore's title. Science doesn't need this kind of cheap tricks.
MrVibrating
1 / 5 (4) Feb 21, 2013
By it's very nature as a forum for, shall we say, alternative esoterics, PESWiki covers everything from NWO conspiracy theories to UFOs and of course exotic energy techs. However it also covers real, emerging technologies that do indeed challenge conventional wisdoms. Muammer Yildiz's motor does appear to be legitimate, and i've had personal access to Steorn's Orbo technology and can confirm that does in fact appear to violate classical conservation - it can sink or source energy to and from the vacuum. The Yildiz implementation is almost certainly harnessing the same form of temporal asymmetry.

Agreed though, this does appear to be slightly OT..
antialias_physorg
4.1 / 5 (9) Feb 21, 2013
Time reversal is an expression you encounter pretty regularly in signal processing. There's nothing 'attention-seeking' about this.
ValeriaT
1.3 / 5 (11) Feb 21, 2013
There would be plenty of research jobs to be had within cold fusion or mag motors, if they worked. And if they worked we probably wouldn't need jobs anyway.
Which is why they were never tested. Why do you think, the opponents of Galileo refused to look through his telescope?
Science doesn't need this kind of cheap tricks.
Scientists and journalists just need a money. The taking money for ignorance requires such a tricks regularly..
MrVibrating
1 / 5 (4) Feb 21, 2013
(cont.)

It's unfortunate that the other, bad woo on the site doesn't help lend credence to the good stuff, but ultimately there IS no better repository of good quality woo on teh interwebz. Viewer discretion is always advised when it comes to drawing the line of course, but you're not going to find out about LENR or time-variant magnetic interactions here or at Nature et al.. Even New Scientist got panned for showing Shawyer the time of day. So whatever you think of Sterling Allen's personal beliefs and motivations, he has to be applauded for his tireless work in giving all these controversial claims a fair hearing.

I read both sites (this one and that one) every day...
Ober
3 / 5 (2) Feb 21, 2013
To me, this sounds like a hologram. Shine light on a scattered 2D pattern to re-create a 3D focused image. Am I wrong??
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (8) Feb 21, 2013
Even New Scientist got panned for showing Shawyer the time of day.
Now the EMDrive was finally replicated with Chinese - after ten years of ignorance. Who is the pathological skeptic, crackpot and troll, after then - Shawyer or his critics? Why the same situation cannot repeat with magnetic motors, antigravity beams or cold fusion? When the people will realize, that the mainstream physicists are dumb assholes who are just trying to save their jobs and controversial prestige from nuclear weapon development?
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (9) Feb 21, 2013
The Holy Church maintained its prestige only because all other people were religious and stupid. The contemporary situation, when few mainstream scientists can lie the people for whole century is just a consequence of stupidity of their peers. The scientists can just as such stupid, ignorant and opportunistic, as the people, who are paying them.

BTW the principles EMDrive, antigravity and magnetic motors are closely related each other, because their working depends on (shielding of) Tesla's scalar waves at all cases. When one phenomena gets confirmed, the relevance of another findings increases automatically too.
MrVibrating
1 / 5 (2) Feb 21, 2013
Lol not sure i'd go that far, but i've found there's basically a religious divide - some folks who consider themselves rational skeptics are actually self-deluded denialist rote-learners with willfully ignorant closed minds, who usually don't even understand the very texts they try stifling debates with.

To them, it's like adherence to a religion, or following a team sport - a question of absolute beliefs, because they have limited capacity for genuine understanding. Commonly referred to as pseudo-skeptic or patho-sceptics, they invariably resort to ad hom, questioning of one's motives and the worst kinds of pseudoscience - it'd be no exaggeration to state that most of the impossible physics on PESwiki is posted not by FE claimants but rather, their detractors - even when the claimants are themselves clearly and abjectly wrong. Moletrappers like the androgynous 'Mary Yugo' (AKA George Hoddy) and crew, ever-devoted to their tireless quest to save us all from our credulity, bless 'em.
MrVibrating
2.6 / 5 (5) Feb 21, 2013
I wasn't aware of the update on Shawyer's work, thanks for sharing. I continued to hold out hope for it though, and felt it had been unfairly shouted down by the above demographic.

As for Tesla's scalar waves, i'm afraid i've not read enough on the subject to comment, however in the case of both Steorn's and Shawyer's work, i believe both can be explained in terms of standard physics, and i remain open to the possibility of shared characteristics; in Shayer's case if the momentum or position gain is a function of the force asymmetry rather than merely input energy then it's the vacuum doing the motive work, IMHO.

I don't believe mainstream science is necessarily blinkered or cynical, but it is subject to practicalities that are, unfortunately, sometimes counter-productive. Just goes with the turf. And while validation of one controversial idea doesn't necessarily validate any others, if it leaves the mainstream asking where they dropped the ball then that's a Good Thing...
ValeriaT
2.1 / 5 (7) Feb 21, 2013
some folks who consider themselves rational skeptics are actually self-deluded denialist rote-learners with willfully ignorant closed minds
IMO it's quite easy to recognize who is who, when we look, who avoids attempt for replication of foreign findings and ideas. The fear of replication is a typical and most reliable symptom of pathological skepticism, but we recognize many others:

The tendency to deny, rather than doubt
Double standards in the application of criticism
The making of judgments without full inquiry
Tendency to discredit, rather than investigate
Use of ridicule or ad-hominem attacks
Presenting insufficient evidence or proof
Pejorative labeling of proponents as "promoters", "crackpots", etc..
Assuming criticism requires no burden of proof
Making unsubstantiated counter-claims
Tendency to dismiss or ignore all evidence
Suggesting that unconvincing evidence is grounds for dismissing it
Organized skepticism tends to be automatically pathological
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (4) Feb 21, 2013
The fact, some people bring progress in some area of science doesn't imply, they cannot serve as a barrier in another ones. The promoters of protoscience often tend to dismiss old working ideas and theories instead of attempts to explain them with their ideas. Johan Prins is typical example of such aggressive approach: on the one side he brought fundamental experiments into superconductivity research, on the other hand he tends to dismiss all existing concepts of quantum mechanics - even those successful and working ones. Even Einstein, who is known with his insightful approach to relativity was a denier of quantum mechanics - simply because quantum mechanics is dual to relativity in many aspects and Einstein's thinking was biased in the opposite way.

So we can recognize a crackpot just at the moment, when he refuses to think in the way of his opponents, which essentially corresponds the fear of replication of foreign thoughts, experiments and finding of mainstream scientists.
MrVibrating
1 / 5 (2) Feb 21, 2013
I recognise all too well the mindsets you describe, however i think we're all subject to the same fundamental biases - hence the value of the scientific method in obtaining objective truths.

Personally, i abhor the notion of indeterminacy as it seems to challenge causality, and acausal determinants are a contradiction in terms. I believe in information limits, and that some information is relatively indeterminable, without being objectively indeterminate (perhaps Bohm's non-local hidden variables, or Zeilinger's 'single-bit limitation' concept). Anything, other than true randomnsess. I think this was also Einstein's objection.

On balance though i still believe faith in causality is better supported by the evidence than the alternative, Copenhagian view. Yet for all the rationalising, i recognise that it is a belief.

And hey, look at some of Newton's beliefs... we're all human, and very, very fallible.. where might we be without the scientific method?

(waay OT now eh..) ;)
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (4) Feb 21, 2013
hence the value of the scientific method in obtaining objective truths
The only question is, if the so-called scientific method isn't equivalent to simple trial and error approach, typical for blind evolution in nature and/or engineering for example during optimization of car and/or planes. The fact, the scientists seek an occupation at any price often means, that the new paradigm is adopted just after when all less or more meaningful ways and reasons for saving of old theories are exhausted - which isn't very different approach from Holy Church, which accepted the heliocentric model or Big Bang theory at the very end too. So I could say, the approach of Holy Church is infallible and equivalent to scientific method, as it always converges to objective truth as well...;-)

The question is, if we aren't paying our scientists a way too much for such approach. The scientific method should be faster than the acceptation of truth, when all methods for its dismissal or ignorance failed
Infinum
1 / 5 (3) Feb 21, 2013
Exactly the same principle is already being used in opensource software to retrieve original content from blurred images https://github.co...rtDeblur
kochevnik
1.8 / 5 (5) Feb 21, 2013
Tesla AFAIK was the original proponent of phase-conjugated [time reversed] radiation. It auto-aims onto a target with is the biggest spike in spectrum space. It's nothing special if you work with FFTs. I used it for pattern matching in software alone using FFTs. Of course this pattern matching is not intelligent, but essentially looks for the elephant in the living room

Anyway nice to see some students following Tesla's work almost a century later.
Tausch
1 / 5 (2) Feb 21, 2013
lol
Our 'consonance is universal'. Reappearances as well. There is no hurry to reset universals gone astray. Time to break camp.
Camp chatter.
frajo
not rated yet Feb 22, 2013
Time reversal is an expression you encounter pretty regularly in signal processing. There's nothing 'attention-seeking' about this.
As this site is not exclusively devoted to signal processing and at least half of the readership are not scientists the author of this title is fully aware of the additional scientific and colloquial meanings of "time reversal". He even admits knowing this by mentioning "sci-fi seeming technology".
No excuse. Shoddy wordings are shoddy wordings.
roldor
5 / 5 (1) Feb 22, 2013
It`s like a retroreflector at your bike.
It directs the light back to any sources, witout knowing where they are. If you direct a laser to a modulated retroreflector, then the
modulated information would be redirected to the laser, without
knowing where it is located.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Feb 22, 2013
It directs the light back to any sources, witout knowing where they are
Actually the time reversal means the focusing of light into single direction from many sources, i.e. the reverse process of scattering.
Reg Mundy
1 / 5 (6) Feb 23, 2013
@MrVibrating
Lol not sure i'd go that far, but i've found there's basically a religious divide - some folks who consider themselves rational skeptics are actually self-deluded denialist rote-learners with willfully ignorant closed minds, who usually don't even understand the very texts they try stifling debates with.

To them, it's like adherence to a religion, or following a team sport - a question of absolute beliefs, because they have limited capacity for genuine understanding.
etc.
Nice to see someone who shares my view.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (3) Feb 23, 2013
BTW the intuitive deduction of single robust reliable conclusion from may widespread fuzzy weak indicia is an entropic time violation as well. The mainstream physicists of the last century adhere to strictly deterministic inductive approach instead: they're extrapolating few robustly reliable facts (postulates of well established theories) with long linear strictly deterministic logical sequence (i.e. formal derivation of math equations) - until their predictions will not become sufficiently scattered and fuzzy (many versions of string theory with fuzzy landscape of solutions as an example) or rather until their money are going.

Not surprisingly, for these guys the recognition of new phenomena from weak indicia (like the cold fusion) is nearly impossible - their deterministic thinking based on linear derivations of equations is not trained for it. But the findings of new facts are nearly always sorta crossing of entropic time barrier: you should deduce new order from seeming chaos.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (3) Feb 23, 2013
I already explained here many times, that the deterministic inductive approach worked well in certain stage of the observable reality understanding. The space-time is behaving like the water surface, which is being observed with it's own transverse waves. At the beginning such an environment appears complex and chaotic, but with increasing distance the waves are spreading like the deterministic circles across water surface. It means, the more deterministic approach you will use in this stage, the more we will recognize in distant reality.

Unfortunately, when the wave spreading continues, the regular circles will get scattered into underwater and their irregularity increases again. From this moment the more intuitive and less mechanical approach will work better. The scope of Universe in which the deterministic approach works best can be recognized easily as the distance scale, in which all objects appear maximally symmetrical, i.e. spherical (atoms and large stars composed of atoms).
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (3) Feb 23, 2013
The contemporary science, physics in particular is therefore an epoch, when the scientists were trapped into their own understanding of scientific method. This approach exhausted its limits and it did become even contra-productive in many areas, where hyper-dimensional multiparticle phenomena manifest itself in most pronounced way (high temperature superconductivity, cold fusion, antigravity, magnetic motors and all other scalar wave technologies).

At the water surface the energy spreading via transverse surface waves is dominant. These waves move slowly, so that our reality appears as large as possible. It optimizes quantitative approach to reality recognition. But the qualitative reality understanding always involves the longitudinal waves of underwater, which appear like indeterministic noise at the water surface. And frankly speaking- despite the undeniable success of deterministic approach in previous era -we are just at the very beginning of the qualitative reality understanding
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (3) Feb 23, 2013
Somewhat paradoxically, because at the proximity the intuitive holistic approach becomes more effective, our predecessors did achieve some surprising achievements in intuitive reality understanding. They did recognize the shape of our galaxy (wheel of Sun), effects of pyramids, astrological connections of planetary conjunctions and eclipses, the telepathy, telekinesis and levitation, various chi phenomena and/or water cluster effects and homeopathy. I do consider most of these forgotten abilities and phenomena as real, as the technologies of modern era - we should just find the key for their logical and intuitive understanding again. The deterministic approach of modern physics not only didn't help us in their understanding - it actually made us blind to them. So we should find and recognize our old instincts, which were wiped out with our long building of civilization working on deterministic principles. This is actually, what the time reversal findings means.
Q-Star
3.3 / 5 (7) Feb 23, 2013
our predecessors did achieve some surprising achievements in intuitive reality understanding. They did recognize the shape of our galaxy (wheel of Sun), effects of pyramids, astrological connections of planetary conjunctions and eclipses, the telepathy, telekinesis and levitation, various chi phenomena and/or water cluster effects and homeopathy. I do consider most of these forgotten abilities and phenomena as real, as the technologies of modern era - we should just find the key for their logical and intuitive understanding again.


Long night, eh Zephyr?

Since you used the words "most of these forgotten abilities and phenomena as real",,,, Why not just have a list of the ones that you do consider real. And another list of the ones you don't consider real. Could you separate the two? Or withdraw the "most" qualifier?

If you do that you won't need the "somewhat" with the "paradoxically"
Moebius
1 / 5 (3) Feb 23, 2013
I don't like time reversal. Any true time reversal requires the timeline, both past and future, to be fixed. Which means freedom of choice is an illusion. Anything other than fixed requires an infinity of infinities and infinity doesn't exist, it's a figment of our imagination.
borc
5 / 5 (3) Feb 23, 2013
Wow, you guys are really desperate to find a conspiracy. Dig deeper folks, cause this one doesn't pass the smell test.
You claim that scientists are covering up EN MASS technologies that would give them and theirs millions of dollars or more as well as the most prestigious science awards such as the nobel because they want to preserve their jobs? You do realize how little sense that makes. It's like saying NASA is covering up massive Martian civilizations because they don't want to lose their jobs. Dude, wait, WHAT? You suggest cold fusion is so easy, make a prototype and become a billionaire overnight. otherwise kindly move along.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (3) Feb 24, 2013
Wow, you guys are really desperate to find a conspiracy.
It's not so difficult to find the examples of organized suppression, as they're documented on the web. Such a suppression continues even by now, twenty years after cold fusion (the very famous physicists involves is Ernest Moniz, the future energy secretary of Obama's government).

But in general, the accusation from fear of conspiracy is typical strawman argument, because it's apparently false. The ignorance of cold fusion doesn't need to be organized at all, when most of relevant physicists are already engaged in research of alternative methods of energy production/conversion/transport and storage. They all already have very good motivation why not to support the cold fusion research, so they don't need any secret organized conspiracy for it. It's a groupthink effect.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (3) Feb 24, 2013
It's like saying NASA is covering up massive Martian civilizations because they don't want to lose their jobs

The finding of Martians would bring lotta jobs for NASA, which is why even very particular results regarding Mars life are announced so bombasticaly. So no, your example is exactly the opposite to real situation - it just illustrates, you don't understand, how the contemporary science is working at all.
You suggest cold fusion is so easy, make a prototype and become a billionaire overnight. otherwise kindly move along
I'm not getting the equipment and job from tax payers for it. I don't require to construct working prototype, just to replicate the twenty years old primitive experiments of Piantelli and Focardi and to publish the results - positive or negative - in peer reviewed press. Until the physicists will not do it, they don't follow scientific method
Tausch
1 / 5 (2) Feb 26, 2013
All physical waves have a time component. Side that aside and you have a constant.
coolergrain
1 / 5 (1) Feb 28, 2013
Does anyone else see the horrible potential to kill people with technology like this?
Tektrix
5 / 5 (1) Feb 28, 2013
I don't like time reversal. Any true time reversal requires the timeline, both past and future, to be fixed. Which means freedom of choice is an illusion. Anything other than fixed requires an infinity of infinities and infinity doesn't exist, it's a figment of our imagination.


That is the best example of self-contradiction I've seen in a while. You first say you don't like time reversal because it implies fixity. Then you say that anything without fixity implies infinitude, but that infinities don't exist. Apparently then you must remain disappointed because if infinities don't exist, then there is only fixity, and in that case, time-reversal is possible which makes free will an illusion.

ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Feb 28, 2013
Time reversal is more than fixity. In recent years the vacuum is modeled with metamaterials, which is essentially the relevant approach, because in dense aether model the space-time foam has a properties of metamaterial too. Inside the metamaterials the light is scattered in similar way, like the light around black holes, for example: we can recognize the photon sphere and the event horizon, which swallows all energy with no mercy.

But the other consequences of metamaterial model of vacuum aren't so studied, as they violate the mainstream theories. One of these consequences is the existence of time-reversed waves. These waves are illustrated here. The central part of animation is representing the actual metamaterial in which the ripples are spreading in the opposite direction from their source.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Feb 28, 2013
Therefore if we admit the metamaterial model of transverse light wave scattering (A) inside of vacuum, we should admit even (B), which is very weird possibility, that the very subtle and rare events may be affected even with our future. And these events are mediated with scalar waves, which are essentially the evanescent waves of the vacuum density fluctuations. With respect to light these events have causality reversed and because we cannot see into future in general, we are considering them a random noise. But if we would monitor the subtle changes in CMBR noise, we could deduce some distant/future events, which weren't still observed with light waves. Note than in dense aether model the CMBR noise is manifestation of gravitational waves, which are superluminal and essentially random in AWT. But their subtle portion may be observable like the time reversed waves traveling TOWARD their source.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Feb 28, 2013
One of the reasons, why I'm interested about this model is, they could be detected with neurons inside of our brain and they could represent the tangible physical basis for various esoteric psychic phenomena like the telepathy and divination.
coolergrain
1 / 5 (1) Mar 01, 2013
ValeriaT, I am not up on the physics, but am excited that there is a possibility of actual free-choice. I have thought of our existence as totally on-rails for quite some time, and am not totally convinced that this is not true. Being able to move backwards in time, e.g., sending signals from the future to change the past does seem like it could break the linearity of our existence. I had a psychic dream at the age of 7. The night before a first day of camp, I dreamed about school buses on a circular driveway and that a friend from the previous school year would come onto the bus. After I actually saw the buses on the circular driveway and the friend come onto the bus, I couldn't believe what had happened.
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Mar 02, 2013
My antimatter self disagrees with the difficulty of reproduction.
Finding anti-me is notoriously difficult.
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Mar 02, 2013
Is the ratio between order and disorder a unit of measure?
Is light in vacuum a unit of measure?
Do you have a choice?

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