Portland State researchers say Columbia River conditions suitable for invasive mussels

Feb 18, 2013

(AP)—Researchers from Portland State University say the Columbia River has suitable conditions for invasive freshwater mussels to grow if they get a toehold.

The researchers told the Northwest Power and Conservation Council on Thursday that the water chemistry and temperatures are suitable for quagga and zebra mussels to grow if they get introduced. The Willamette River is marginal due to lower calcium levels. The researchers are also experimenting with paints that would make it tougher for the mussels to form thick crusty mats on submerged surfaces.

The mussels have wreaked havoc on docks, dams, and freshwater ecosystems from the to the Southwest, but so far have not invaded the Northwest.

Oregon and other states inspect boats crossing their borders to prevent an invasion.

Researchers from Portland State University say the has suitable conditions for invasive to grow if they get a toehold.

The researchers told the Northwest Power and Conservation Council on Thursday that the water chemistry and temperatures are suitable for quagga and zebra mussels to grow if they get introduced. The Willamette River is marginal due to lower calcium levels. The researchers are also experimenting with paints that would make it tougher for the mussels to form thick crusty mats on submerged surfaces.

The have wreaked havoc on docks, dams, and freshwater from the Great Lakes to the Southwest, but so far have not invaded the Northwest.

Oregon and other states inspect boats crossing their borders to prevent an invasion.

Explore further: Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife

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Genkigirll
not rated yet Feb 18, 2013
Wow! It's like getting two articles for the price of one ^___^

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