Newt transcriptome offers insight into tissue regeneration

Feb 19, 2013
Scientists have identified protein families expressed during tissue regeneration in newts, providing the groundwork for research into whether particular sets of genes are used for the purpose. The transcriptome -- the map of all RNA molecules -- of the newt is published this week in BioMed Central’s open access journal Genome Biology. Credit: Thomas Braun

Scientists have identified protein families expressed during tissue regeneration in newts, providing the groundwork for research into whether particular sets of genes are used for the purpose.

The transcriptome – the map of all – of the newt is published this week in 's open access journal . Notophthalmus viridescens is a useful model in regenerative medicine, thanks to its ability to regenerate tissue, and this data gives insights into the mechanisms behind this process.

N. viridescens, the common newt, is native to North America, and an urodelian amphibian. Newt and salamander genomes are enormous; currently too big to sequence, but their potential to regenerate entire limbs, along with parts of the , has fascinated scientists for over 200 years. Thomas Braun, Thilo Borchardt at the Max Planck Institutes, Patagonis Tsonis at the University of Dayton and their colleagues sequenced a collection of healthy and regenerated tissues from newts, and converged them into one comprehensive transcriptome. Their analysis identified 826 proteins specific for urodeles, and several newly identified proteins that they believe may play important roles in regeneration process unique for urodeles. Their data also outline genes that appear only in regenerating, but not uninjured material, which will be of interest in regenerative medicine.

The transcriptome is not complete, but serves as a matrix for further analyses. The authors believe that their findings represent only the tip of the iceberg: 'Our data provide the groundwork for mechanistic experiments to answer the question whether urodeles utilize proprietary sets of genes for .' They continue: 'The newly established de novo transcriptome [...] will be an indispensable resource for a better understanding of regenerative events in newts and facilitate the identifications of molecules [...] that control this fascinating process.'

Explore further: Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful versus helpful viruses

Related Stories

Scientists identify mammal model of bladder regeneration

Oct 12, 2012

While it is well known that starfish, zebrafish and salamanders can re-grow damaged limbs, scientists understand very little about the regenerative capabilities of mammals. Now, researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical ...

New findings on immune system in amphibians

Jun 19, 2008

Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes produce proteins that are crucial in fighting pathogen assault. Researchers from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow and from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental ...

Recommended for you

DNA may have had humble beginnings as nutrient carrier

13 hours ago

New research intriguingly suggests that DNA, the genetic information carrier for humans and other complex life, might have had a rather humbler origin. In some microbes, a study shows, DNA pulls double duty ...

Central biobank for drug research

13 hours ago

For the development of new drugs it is crucial to work with stem cells, as these allow scientists to study the effects of new active pharmaceutical ingredients. But it has always been difficult to derive ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

VendicarE
not rated yet Feb 20, 2013
Fortunately Newt never recovered from his Contract on America.
Birger
not rated yet Feb 20, 2013
It is good that Newt is useful for *something* :-)
--- --- --- --- --- ---
"Their potential to regenerate entire limbs, along with parts of the central nervous system, has fascinated scientists for over 200 years"
-And let us not forget that some newts can be frozen solid during winter and still re-emerge alive! This kind of extreme suspended animation is something mammals can only dream of.