NASA sees the falling of Cyclone Felleng

Feb 04, 2013
NASA's TRMM satellite flew over Cyclone Felleng on Feb. 1 at 11:48 a.m. EST and measured a small area of heavy rainfall (red) east of the center of circulation where rainfall was occurring at 2 inches (50 mm per hour). Most of the other precipitation was moderate, falling at a rate of 1.18 to 1.5 inches (30 to 40 mm) per hour. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

Cyclone Felleng traveled through the Mozambique Channel during the week of Jan. 28, 2013 and emerged south into the Southern Indian Ocean where it transitioned into a cold core low pressure area. NASA's TRMM satellite captured a look at the rainfall rates occurring in Felleng as it was making that transition on Feb. 1.

NASA's Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew over Cyclone Felleng on Feb. 1 at 1648 UTC (11:48 a.m. EST) as it was exiting the Mozambique Channel and becoming extra-tropical. TRMM measured a small area of heavy rainfall east of the center of circulation where rainfall was occurring at 2 inches (50 mm per hour). Most of the precipitation wrapped from northeast to south to west of the center and was moderate, falling at a rate of 1.18 to 1.5 inches (30 to 40 mm) per hour. The northwestern quadrant had very little rainfall at the time of the TRMM overpass.

The Joint (JTWC) , the organization that forecasts in the Southern Indian Ocean, issued their final advisory on Cyclone Felleng on Feb. 3 at 2100 UTC (4 p.m. EST). At that time, Felleng's were near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph. Felleng was located about 745 nautical miles (857 miles/1,380 km) south of La Reunion Island, near 33.4 South and 54.3 East. Felleng was moving to the south-southeast at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph).

By Monday, Feb. 4 at 0600 UTC Felleng had completed its extra-tropical transition, and the storm's maximum sustained winds continued near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). Felleng's center had moved to 31.1 south and 52.8 east, about 605 nautical miles (696.2 miles/1,120 km) south-southwest of La Reunion Island. Felleng continues to move south-southeast in the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean where it is expected to dissipate in the next couple of days.

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