Researchers develop new method of controlling nanodevices

Feb 25, 2013 by Bill Kisliuk
Researchers develop new method of controlling nanodevices

(Phys.org)—Electromagnetic devices, from power drills to smart-phones, require an electric current to create the magnetic fields that allow them to function. But with smaller devices, efficiently delivering a current to create magnetic fields becomes more difficult.

In a discovery that could lead to big changes in storing digital information and powering motors in small hand-held devices, researchers at UCLA have developed a method for switching tiny magnetic fields on and off with an electric field—a sharp departure from the traditional approach of running a current through a wire.

The researchers, affiliated with the university's National Science Foundation–funded TANMS (Translational Applications of Nanoscale Multiferroic Systems), developed a composite that can control magneto-electric activity at a scale of about 10 nanometers, some 1,000 times smaller than a . Previously, the instability of at this scale made it impossible to control their movement, much less the energy reaching them.
 
The team used a composite of nickel nanocrystals coupled with a single crystal of —which can generate power when a small amount of force is applied to it—to control the north–south orientation of the particles as well as their tendency to spin around, which are essential aspects of activating or deactivating a magnetic field.

The findings could potentially change the way electromagnetic devices are designed in the future. With further research, the team said, the discovery may allow significant miniaturization of equipment ranging from memory devices and antennas to instruments used to analyze blood. The researchers noted that while their findings represent a major scientific step, practical applications of the discovery are likely years away.

The research was published online Feb. 11 in the peer-reviewed journal (http://bit.ly/W8zhxd) and will appear in an upcoming print edition of the journal.

Explore further: Using strong lasers, investigators observe frenzy of electrons in a new material

More information: Magnetoelectric Control of Superparamagnetism, Nano Lett., Article ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/nl3034637

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vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (1) Feb 26, 2013
(Phys.org)—Electromagnetic devices, from power drills to smart-phones, require an electric current to create the magnetic fields that allow them to function. But with smaller devices, efficiently delivering a current to create magnetic fields becomes more difficult.

Believe it or not! It seems that we are so familiar with electric and magnetic fields, but actually we do not know what they are, how electron create them and so on. Knowing the mechanism of electron will make us understand nature of electric and magnetic fields as below.
http://www.vacuum...21〈=en

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