Ice age extinction shaped Australian plant diversity, study finds

Feb 12, 2013
Ice age extinction shaped Australian plant diversity
Hakea Ambigua. Credit: J. Young FloraBase

Researchers have shown that part of Australia's rich plant diversity was wiped out by the ice ages, proving that extinction, instead of evolution, influences biodiversity.

The research led by the University of Melbourne and University of Tasmania has shown that plant diversity in South East Australia was as rich as some of the most diverse places in the world, and that most of these species went extinct during the ice ages, probably about one million years ago.

The team's work was published in the prestigious US today.

Dr Sniderman of the University of Melbourne's School of Earth Sciences said the findings show is just as important to diversity of organisms as evolution.

"Traditionally scientists believed some places have more species than others because species evolved more rapidly in these places. We have overthrown this theory, which emphasizes evolution, by showing that extinction may be more important, " he said.

The study compared two regions of and South Africa.

"South-western Australia has a huge diversity of tough-leaved shrubs and trees such as eucalypts, Banksia, Grevilleas and Acacias, making it one of the most biodiverse places on earth," Dr Sniderman said.

"The southern tip of South Africa is even richer, with astonishing numbers of similar kinds of like proteas and ericas."

Scientists have long maintained that this diversity is somehow related to the poor soils and dry summers of these places.

For the study researchers analysed that accumulated in an ancient lake in South Eastern Australia. They found the region had at least as many tough-leaved plants 1.5 million years ago as Western Australia and South Africa do today.

The results were entirely unexpected.

"As Australia dried out over the past several million years, rainforest plants largely disappeared from most of the continent," said Dr Sniderman

"It has been thought that this drying trend allowed Australia's characteristic tough-leaved plants to expand and became more diverse. We have shown that the climate variability of the ice ages not only drove rainforest plants to extinction but also a remarkable number of tough-leaved, shrubby plants," he said.  

Dr Greg Jordan of the School of Plant Sciences at the University of Tasmanian said not only has the study overturned current thought on the role of extinction in plant diversity, it has implications for understanding how Australian will deal with current and future climate change.

"The species that went extinct in SE Australia during the ice ages were likely to be the ones most sensitive to rapid climate change, meaning that the species that now grow in eastern Australia may be more capable of tolerating rapid changes than predicted by current science," he said.

"However, the in hotspots of diversity like Western Australia may be much more sensitive to future climate change, because they have been protected from past climate changes."

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ChasWatring
5 / 5 (2) Feb 12, 2013
Hi, I found this post to be very interesting. I like that you have spoke of extinction hand in hand with evolution. I agree that extinction is just as important to diversity of organisms as evolution. I knew that South Africa was full of diversity, but never really though about Australia as having an even richer diversity than that of Africa! It's mindblowing to read that the diversity is linked to the poor soils and dry summers of Africa and Australia. What's even more astonishing is that South Eastern Australia had at least as many tough-leaved plants 1.5 million years ago ago as Western Australia and South Africa do today! It's sad to read that the species in these hotspots may be be much more sensitive to the future climate change - since they have been protected from past climate changes. I really hate how extinction is taking so many great species of plants and animals. I wish we could slow down this process.