Famous fraud cases foster a revolution in photograph conservation research

February 27, 2013

Two fraud cases that sent shock waves through the world of photography are helping to trigger a revolution in photo conservation science, according to the cover story in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News.

Sarah Everts, C&EN European correspondent, explains that the prestige and prices of photographs—long dismissed by the art establishment as a second-tier medium—began to rival those of paintings and sculptures in the 1980s. Collectors began paying hundreds of thousands of dollars and even up to $1 million for vintage and contemporary photographs. Fraud cases appeared in parallel with that rise in popularity.

The article describes those cases, and explains how they led to million-dollar settlements that helped stimulate photo conservation research, transforming a niche field into what is now a mature science. Those conservation efforts embrace everything from family snapshots to priceless masterpieces, the article points out.

Explore further: Unlocking the secrets of ripening for better tasting fruits and veggies

More information: Saving Endangered Images, Chemical & Engineering News. cenm.ag/photohistory

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3.7 / 5 (3) Feb 27, 2013
How is a trailer for a magazine article appropriate material for phys.org?
1 / 5 (1) Mar 04, 2013
Hmmm another advert...

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