Lighting experts push for LED quality standard

Feb 05, 2013
Lighting experts push for LED quality standard
Energy efficient LED lamps need national quality standards to win over consumers, say lighting experts at the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis. Credit: Kathreen Fontecha, CLTC/UC Davis.

(Phys.org)—It is not enough to be energy efficient; LED lighting also must be consistently high quality and reliable to win over consumers.

That message, from the California Center at the University of California, Davis, helped prompt the to include quality criteria for LED replacement lamps in its first-in-the-nation energy efficiency directive on Dec. 12, 2012.

Now, the CLTC is urging the U.S. 's to create similar criteria for LEDs on a national scale.

"This needs to happen as soon as possible, to guide manufacturers to higher quality products, before the market is flooded with products that fall short of consumer expectations," wrote the CLTC's Michael Siminovitch, Konstantinos Papamichael and James Benya, in a recent letter to the EPA's ENERGY STAR program, which is reviewing its specification for LED lamps.

Other lighting industry leaders joined CLTC in filing separate comments in support of higher color rendering criteria for LED lamps. They include: the International Association of Lighting Designers, Northeast Utilities Companies and LED manufacturer Soraa.

The move comes as is entering the residential market in earnest and consumers are faced with products of varying quality. The CLTC directors say adopting a quality standard could help ensure that consumers' of LED technology are positive ones.

The CLTC letter points to as a cautionary tale. Since 1999, when ENERGY STAR first established criteria for CFLs, the requirements have focused on energy efficiency, while utilities have focused on lower costs. The result—energy-efficient, low-cost products that often compromised color quality—failed to impress consumers. Less than 9 percent of American homes have reached a market saturation rate for CFLs, according to ENERGY STAR studies.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

"LEDs now present us with a second chance to transform the lighting market," the CLTC leaders wrote in their letter. "The energy savings opportunity is larger than with CFLs, and LEDs have the potential to deliver lighting quality that comes much closer to incandescent sources. We urge ENERGY STAR to establish high standards for color rendering and color consistency in LED replacement lamps."

The concept of a national LED quality standard was first championed in a white paper co-authored by Siminovitch and Papamichael, both professors in the UC Davis Department of Design. The paper sparked intense discussion among leaders in the lighting industry, design world and energy sectors. CLTC hosted several roundtable sessions that engaged regulators, manufacturers, researchers and energy efficiency experts. This collaborative effort produced the performance criteria of the California lighting quality standard.

The CEC's decision followed a California Public Utilities Commission directive in May 2012 to include quality metrics in future utility programs. The new statewide energy efficiency directive takes effect in January 2014.

"For LEDs to really gain long-term acceptance, they have to deliver the kind of color quality and reliability that consumers have come to expect from incandescents," said Siminovitch. "A quality specification will go a long way toward helping California—and the nation—transition to more -efficient lighting."

Explore further: Congress: Safety agency mishandled GM recall

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Save energy, money with Philips AmbientLED 12.5 watt

Feb 16, 2011

The world's first LED replacement for a 60-watt incandescent bulb is now also the first to earn ENERGY STAR qualification. Philips Lighting announced today that the Philips AmbientLED 12.5 watt (also sold professionally under ...

NIST 'Vision Science Facility' aims for lighting revolution

Sep 29, 2010

Light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, have become popular with backpackers and cyclists who mount them on headbands for a reliable, hands-free source of illumination. Now, a new lab at the National Institute of Standards and Technology ...

Soraa LED light may dim 50-watt halogen rivals

Feb 09, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Soraa, a Fremont, California company founded in 2008, this week launched its first product, a light that uses LEDS (light emitting diodes). The "Soraa LED MR16 lamp" is the "perfect" replacement ...

LED there be light

Jun 22, 2009

Q: How many LED engineers does it take to change a light bulb?

Recommended for you

Congress: Safety agency mishandled GM recall

Sep 17, 2014

Both houses of Congress scolded the U.S. highway safety agency Tuesday over its tardy handling of a deadly problem with General Motors cars, questioning whether it is competent to guarantee the safety of ...

Jindal: Obama hasn't done enough to harness energy

Sep 16, 2014

The governor of the state of Louisiana, a possible Republican presidential candidate, said Tuesday that President Barack Obama's administration has become "science deniers," failing to do enough to harness the nation's energy ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Shakescene21
4.5 / 5 (2) Feb 05, 2013
I hope these guys are successful. We had such a bad experience with crappy CFL bulbs that my wife won't allow them in the house.
I would love to use LED bulbs but I don't want to get fooled again.
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Feb 05, 2013
"This needs to happen as soon as possible, to guide manufacturers to higher quality products, before the market is flooded with products that fall short of consumer expectations,"


Too late. Already happened.

Most off-the-shelf LED products are utter crap with highly exaggerated performance claims. The ones that aren't cost $50 a pop, but you still can't trust that you're getting what is promised because there's usually no practical way to verify the lumen output, CRI, or the lifetime in excess of 25,000 hours.

I was recently burned by Varta of all companies, who sold me a LED lantern they promised was 4 Watts and 300 lumens. Well, I did some experiments and figured out that the diode may be a 4 Watt part, but it is actually run between 0.5 - 1 Watts to achieve the claimed battery life on the lantern.

What I though was equivalent to a 25 Watt regular lighbulb turned out to be no brighter that an ordinary cheap flashlight. The fact that the color is blue helps to hide it.