Brin sees Google glasses hitting market this year

Feb 27, 2013 by Glenn Chapman
Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google, wears the Google Glass on June 27, 2012 in San Francisco. Brin envisions Google's Internet glasses hitting the market this year with an eye toward freeing people from unsocial habits engendered by "emasculating" smartphones.

Sergey Brin envisions Google's Internet glasses hitting the market this year with an eye toward freeing people from unsocial habits engendered by "emasculating" smartphones.

Brin spoke of inspiration behind Google eyewear during a brief appearance Wednesday on stage at a known for an inspiring mix of influential big thinkers and "ideas worth spreading.

He playfully demonstrated his point on stage by ignoring a theater audience to stare down at his , saying he was intent on a message from a Nigerian prince need of $10 million dollars.

"I like to pay attention because that is how we originally funded the company," the Google co-founder quipped about a well-known scam.

"Seriously, in addition to potentially socially isolating yourself when you are out and about using your phone, I feel it is kind of emasculating," he continued.

Brin described Glass as the first form factor to deliver on a vision he had from Google's inception that one day would be outmoded and information from the Internet would come to people when they need it.

Glass frees the eyes as well as the hands when it comes to connecting to the Internet on the go, according to Brin.

"That is why we put the display up high, out of the line of sight," Brin said, wearing the Glass eyewear he is rarely seen without.

"If I wore a ball cap, the display would be on the brim and not where you are looking," he continued. "And sound goes through bones in the cranium, which is a little freaky at first, but you get used to it."

Glass wearers can speak commands to the eyewear, and built-in allows pictures or video to be captured from first-person perspectives while people take part in what is happening.

"Lastly, I realized I also have a nervous tic," Brin said. "The cell phone is a nervous habit. If I smoked, I'd probably smoke instead."

He observed that smartphones sometimes become props used by people as distractions or to appear busy, saying that Glass strips away excuses not to be sociable or to not be honest about simply wanting to take a break.

"It really opened by eyes to how much of my life I spent secluded away in email, social posts or what-not," Brin said. "There is nothing bad about that, but with this thing I don't have to be checking them all the time."

Brin said Glass eyewear will be available later this year at prices lower than the $1,500 charged to software developers and early adopters during a restricted test phase.

Wednesday was the last day for "explorers" with creative vision and $1,500 to spare to vie to be part of a select group of people who get to experiment with Glass.

A video intended to capture what it feels like to use Glass was online at google.com/glass/start/.

Google has been speaking with eyeglass frame companies about ideas for a consumer version of the glasses, which he expected would cost "significantly" less than the Explorer prototypes.

US adults interested in the program had to say what they would do if they had Glass eyewear and then post the messages at Twitter or + social networks with hashtag #ifihadglass.

People chosen for the Explorer program will need to pick up in person at sessions to be held in New York, Los Angeles, or San Francisco.

Explore further: Gift Guide: Strong photo, video gear options

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

With Page voiceless, Brin appears at Google show

Jun 27, 2012

(AP) — Google co-founder Sergey Brin made a splashy entrance during a San Francisco conference while CEO Larry Page recovered from an ailment that has left him unable to speak.

Google co-founder 'pretty happy' in stealth role

Oct 20, 2011

(AP) -- Google co-founder Sergey Brin took a break from his work on the Internet search leader's secret projects to make a surprise appearance at a technology conference Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Ear-check via phone can ease path to diagnosis

Dec 18, 2014

Ear infections are common in babies and young children. That it is a frequent reason for young children's visit to doctors comes as no consolation for the parents of babies tugging at their ears and crying ...

Gift Guide: Home products come with connectivity

Dec 18, 2014

Do you really need an app to tell you to brush and floss? It seems every household appliance is getting some smarts these days, meaning some connection to a phone app and the broader Internet. But then what?

BlackBerry launches Classic in last-ditch effort

Dec 17, 2014

(AP)—BlackBerry is returning to its roots with a new phone that features a traditional keyboard at a time when rival Apple and Android phones—and most smartphone customers—have embraced touch screens.

Tag Heuer changes tune, now looking at smartwatches

Dec 16, 2014

Barely a few months after dismissing Apple's smartwatch, the new chief executive of luxury Swiss watchmaker Tag Heuer conceded Tuesday that such a hi-tech gadget might after all have a place in his firm's ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

barakn
3 / 5 (2) Feb 27, 2013
I'm sorry, but how is pretending to be interacting with someone by appearing to gaze in their direction while really paying attention to an electronic device any better than looking down at a smart phone? Answer: it's actually worse because it's devious. Not that staring at your phone or poking at it with your fingers while you're theoretically having a conversation with a real live person is good.
FMA
not rated yet Mar 02, 2013
It is not a good idea to hook up the line all the time, the reason for that is your brain sometime have questions to ask yourself and sometime answers might pop up as well.

If you are always on line, those questions and answers have no chance to come out.

I don't even have a smartphone.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.