Brazil hosts Russian satellite navigation system

Feb 19, 2013

(AP)—Brazil has become the first country outside Russia to host part of that nation's satellite navigation system, which is known as Glonass.

The Brazilian Space Agency says Tuesday on its website that the system is similar to the of the United States.

The agency and its Russian counterpart Roscosmos will operate the system installed at the University of Brasilia.

Glonass uses 24 satellites to provide worldwide.

The website quotes space agency president Jose Raimundo Coelho as saying the "partnership will help prepare qualified Brazilian professionals and give the Russians a more efficient system."

He says the Glonass system can also be used by the university to conduct aerospace and biomedical research.

Explore further: Curiosity brushes 'Bonanza king' target anticipating fourth red planet rock drilling

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Russia launches navigation satellite

Nov 28, 2011

Russia on Monday successfully launched a satellite for its Glonass global navigation system from its Plesetsk cosmodrome, the country's space agency said.

Russia surprised as Apple uses Glonass in new iPhone

Oct 20, 2011

The secret is out and making Russia proud: pop culture and geek tech icon Apple has picked Russia's Glonass navigation system to run alongside GPS in its iPhone 4S models that hit stores this month.

Russia launches navigation satellites

Nov 04, 2011

Russia on Friday successfully launched three satellites for its global navigation system Glonass on a Proton-M rocket from its Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Russian space agency said.

Russia plans to launch six satellites

Mar 27, 2007

Russia will add six satellites to its global navigation system, GLONASS, in 2007, a spokesman at Moscow's Research Institute of Space Instrument-Making said.

Recommended for you

Australian amateur Terry Lovejoy discovers new comet

18 hours ago

It's confirmed! Australian amateur astronomer Terry Lovejoy just discovered his fifth comet, C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy). He found it August 17th using a Celestron C8 fitted with a CCD camera at his roll-off roof ...

Students see world from station crew's point of view

Aug 19, 2014

NASA is helping students examine their home planet from space without ever leaving the ground, giving them a global perspective by going beyond a map attached to a sphere on a pedestal. The Sally Ride Earth ...

Mars deep down

Aug 19, 2014

Scarring the southern highlands of Mars is one of the Solar System's largest impact basins: Hellas, with a diameter of 2300 km and a depth of over 7 km.

User comments : 0