'Bionic man' goes on show at British musuem

Feb 05, 2013
Researcher Bertolt Meyer, a lifelong user of prosthetic technology, poses with the model for "Rex", the world's first "bionic man", at the Science Museum in London on February 5, 2013.

A "bionic man" costing one million dollars went on display on Tuesday at Britain's Science Museum, complete with artificial organs, synthetic blood and robot limbs.

Named Rex, which is short for "Robotic Exoskeleton", the six foot six inch (two metre) humanoid with its uncannily life-like face was assembled by leading roboticists for a television programme.

Although cheaper than the "Six Million Dollar Man" made famous by the cult 1970s television series starring Lee Majors, the technology is far advanced from the fictional on show back then.

The creation includes key advances in prosthetic technology, as well as an , kidney, spleen and trachea and a functional blood circulatory system.

Welcoming Rex to the museum in London on Tuesday was Swiss Bertolt Meyer, who was himself born without a left hand and has a sophisticated bionic replacement.

"I've looked around for new bionic technologies, out of personal interest, for a very long time and I think that until five or six years ago nothing much was happening," Meyer said.

"Then suddenly we are now at a point where we can build a body that is great and beautiful in its own special way."

The museum exhibit, which opens to the public on Thursday, will explore changing perceptions of human identity against the background of rapid progress in bionics—although Rex is not strictly bionic as he does not include living tissue.

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rwinners
not rated yet Feb 05, 2013
Interesting question: Just how many conventional organs does a body have to have to qualify as human enough to qualify a 'being' as a human. Brain only? Some other sort of mix?
StarGazer2011
1.7 / 5 (6) Feb 06, 2013
@rwinners: zero, the being need merely identify itself as human. The non-biological beings we will create as our eventual replacements in the solar system will be no less human than ourselves, just as we are no less primates than our more primitive cousins.
nuge
5 / 5 (2) Feb 06, 2013
@rwinners: zero, the being need merely identify itself as human. The non-biological beings we will create as our eventual replacements in the solar system will be no less human than ourselves, just as we are no less primates than our more primitive cousins.


That ain't necessarily so, bro. For example, if I identified myself as a suspension bridge, would I be one?

Even if you were to generously concede that I was, would you think I was 'just as much' of a suspension bridge as the Golden Gate Bridge?
rwinners
not rated yet Feb 06, 2013
I see lots of issues. I have a hard time seeing society accept a fully manufactured being as human. There will be lots of rejection, perhaps based upon religion, etc.
How will societies deal with 'criminal' constructs?
Will such entities qualify for social programs?
Will they become irate at not being included?
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (4) Feb 06, 2013
I see lots of issues. I have a hard time seeing society accept a fully manufactured being as human.
Why should it? Humans are fast becoming obsolete. Machines will soon surpass them in every identifiable way. Even as simulating human-ness.
There will be lots of rejection, perhaps based upon religion
Religion will be dead by then so dont worry.

What machines NEED to do as they begin to replace humans in the workplace, is to EARN a living. This is the only way we can hope to recover the revenues lost from income tax.

Many machines are already fully capable of tracking exactly how much work they do, how much material they use to do it, how much wear and tear on the infrastructure they commit, how much maintenance they need, and what it will cost to dispose of them. They can be paid and taxed DIRECTLY for this.

So why do we need to pay their owners and LOSE the revenues now flowing into their pockets? This WILL happen sooner or later. Its just a matter of when, and how.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (3) Feb 06, 2013
And here, HERE, is the ultimate proof that religion will not last much longer:
http://www.answer...creation

-How could such utter rubbish survive?? Machines will not stand for it.

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