First world atlas on renewable energy launched

Jan 14, 2013
Sultan Ahmed al-Jaber, chief executive officer of the Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company (MASDAR), addresses the General Assembly of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in the Emirati capital Abu Dhabi on January 13, 2013.

The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) on Sunday launched the world's first atlas on clean energy which will offer open-access information on countries' renewable energy potential.

"The Global Atlas is the largest ever initiative to help countries assess their potential, and companies bringing together data and maps from leading technical institutes and private companies worldwide," IRENA said.

"It currently charts solar and wind resources, and will expand to other forms of renewable energy over 2013 and 2014," the agency announced as it began its two-day annual general assembly in Abu Dhabi.

The online atlas is available on www.irena.org/GlobalAtlas/

IRENA said the atlas will also help companies looking to invest in new markets.

"Over the next decade, we expect an enormous increase in investment in the field of renewable energy. Global Atlas will help us make the right decisions," said Danish Climate and Energy Minister Martin Lidegaard, who chaired a session at the gathering.

IRENA director Adnan Amin said that by 2014 the atlas will include information on bio-energy, and marine energy.

"The Global Atlas provides a powerful new tool in international efforts to double the world's share of renewable energy by 2030" to around 30 percent of the global energy mix, he said.

Thirty-seven countries, including Israel which has no diplomatic relations with the , have so far contributed information on their renewable energy potentials to the atlas.

Established in 2011, Abu Dhabi-based IRENA is mandated by 159 countries and the European Union to promote the sustainable use of all forms of renewable energy.

Its meeting comes as part of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week which includes the Future , the International Water Summit and the International Renewable Energy Conference.

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Arcbird
1 / 5 (1) Jan 14, 2013
Just learn to do nuclear the correct way and this becomes obsolete.
djr
5 / 5 (1) Jan 14, 2013
Just learn to do nuclear the correct way and this becomes obsolete.

Why? Don't you think there are a lot of really smart minds working overtime on the nuclear issue right now? GE and many others are chomping at the bit to make a crap load of money by cracking the nuclear nut. There are some significant technical challenges. Even when they do crack that nut (I hope and believe they will) - renewables will still have a significan role. Decentralized, cheap, infinite - they will be part of our future.

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