Superconductors for efficient wind power plants: Researchers develop cooling system for novel generator

Jan 04, 2013
Superconductors for efficient wind power plants
Superconducting generators will provide offshore wind power plants with higher performance at lower costs. Credit: Tecnalia

(Phys.org)—An efficient, robust, and compact wind power plant with a 10 MW superconducting generator is being developed by partners from industry and science within the recently established EU project SUPRAPOWER. Superconduction enables considerable savings of energy and raw materials. Within SUPRAPOWER, researchers at KIT's Institute for Technical Physics (ITEP) develop a rotating cryostat cooling the superconducting coils down to minus 253°C - a temperature crucial for electric current flow without resistance.

Wind power will make a major contribution to the energy turnaround. Efficient by means of offshore power plants requires powerful, reliable generators that do not cause disproportionately high logistic efforts and do not require complex foundations. Using generators with , performance can be increased to 10 MW while at the same time reducing the units' weights and sizes. Besides, superconducting generators can be built with less than one hundredth of the quantity of required for manufacturing the currently most frequently used permanent magnet generator. Superconduction, hence, allows setting up of efficient, robust, and compact at reduced building, operating, and maintenance costs.

It is the objective of the EU-supported project SUPRAPOWER (SUPerconducting, Reliable, lightweight, And more POWERful offshore wind turbine) to use the high potential of supraconduction for expansion of wind power. In the four-year project that has started now nine partners from industry and science cooperate under the coordination of Fundación Tecnalia Research & Innovation, Spain. Together, the partners develop a wind power plant with direct-drive superconducting generator. The innovative direct drive, in addition, reduces transport and maintenance costs and extends the service life of the turbine.

The Cryogenic Engineering Division at KIT's Institute for Technical Physics (ITEP) contributes the cooling system: Below a certain temperature, superconductors have no electrical resistance and conduct electricity without loss. To ensure proper operation of the superconducting generator, the coils must be cooled below this so-called transition temperature. The researchers at ITEP are developing a rotating low-loss that cools down the superconducting coils to 20 Kelvin (minus 253.15 °C) through pure heat conduction by means of small Gifford-McMahon coolers provided by the project partner Oerlikon Leybold Vacuum. "Since the cooling performance of such coolers is limited, we must ensure that heat between them and the superconducting coils is conducted well. Besides, we must consider the influence of rotation on the heat pipes we may use. On the other hand, the cryostat needs a highly effective thermal insulation," explains Head of the Cryogenic Engineering Division Dr. Holger Neumann. Work on the cooling system translates the findings from fundamental research to practice and, hence, is most attractive to young scientists.

Explore further: Magnets for fusion energy: A revolutionary manufacturing method developed

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Generator with superconductors

Mar 30, 2011

Siemens and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) plan to demonstrate that high-temperature superconductor technology is suitable for power generation in everyday operation. The research project, which ...

Powering wind energy with superconductivity

Sep 21, 2011

Energy prices and environmental concerns are driving the United States to rethink its energy mix and to develop domestic sources of clean, renewable energy.

Recommended for you

Physicists discuss quantum pigeonhole principle

Jul 26, 2014

The pigeonhole principle: "If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole." So where's the argument? Physicists say there is an important argument. While the ...

First in-situ images of void collapse in explosives

Jul 25, 2014

While creating the first-ever images of explosives using an x-ray free electron laser in California, Los Alamos researchers and collaborators demonstrated a crucial diagnostic for studying how voids affect ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

cyberCMDR
1 / 5 (1) Jan 04, 2013
Cool!
hb_
5 / 5 (1) Jan 08, 2013
What is the coolant? If it is helium, this is patently stupid. There is not enough helium to cool all required power plants, and it is a limited resource. Cryostats leak, albeit a a low rate..

Helium is a rare resource, and we are basically getting it from the american strategic reserves (that are being sold out) and as a by-product from natural gas production. Once helium escapes from a cryostat, it escapes from the atmosphere and into space. Talk about being dependent on a limited resource!!!