Rare San Francisco river otter stumps researchers

Jan 03, 2013

For the first time in decades, a river otter has made San Francisco its home, taking up residence in the ruins of a 19th Century seaside bath near the Golden Gate Bridge.

The otter has mystified and delighted , who are piecing together clues to figure out how he got there.

River otters once thrived in the . But development and the fur trade in the 19th and early 20th centuries nearly wiped them out.

A group called the River Otter Ecology Project studies otter populations further north and in the bay. It says until now it had no evidence the creatures had returned to San Francisco.

The otter is nicknamed "Sutro Sam" after the old baths, which were named after former San Francisco Mayor Adolph Sutro.

Explore further: Thai Airways bans shark fin from cargo flights

3.3 /5 (3 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New light on otter mystery

Jul 19, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- The solitary and mysterious lives of British otters are being uncovered by Cardiff scientists – thanks to help from the public.

Otters on road to recovery in Andalusia

Mar 07, 2011

Improved environmental conditions have enabled the otter (Lutra lutra) to spread in Andalusia over the past 20 years. However, the recovery of populations of this mammal has been "relatively" slow, and in some areas the im ...

Sea Otters' Diet is Clue to Slow Recovery

Feb 12, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- UC Davis researchers trying to understand the sea otter's slow recovery in California have found an important clue: Some sea otters feed almost exclusively on animals that raise their risk of being infected ...

Recommended for you

Classic Lewis Carroll character inspires new ecological model

10 hours ago

Inspired by the Red Queen in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, collaborators from the University of Illinois and National University of Singapore improved a 35-year-old ecology model to better understand how species ...

Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants

14 hours ago

Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

MCPtz
not rated yet Jan 03, 2013
I might go otter watching soon :)